April Meeting, 1938

    A STATED Meeting of the Society was held, at the invitation of the Hon. Robert Walcott, at the Signet Club, No. 46 Dunster Street, Cambridge, on Thursday, April 21, 1938, at half after eight o’clock in the evening, Vice-President Matt Bushnell Jones in the chair.

    The records of the last Stated Meeting were read and approved.

    The chair reported the death on February 27, 1938, of Chester Noyes Greenough, a Resident Member.

    Mr. Charles Henry Taylor of Boston was elected a Resident Member of the Society.

    The chair appointed the following committees in anticipation of the Annual Meeting:

    To nominate candidates for the several offices,—Dr. Reginald Fitz and Messrs. Stewart Mitchell and Philip Putnam Chase.

    To examine the Treasurer’s accounts,—Messrs. Nathaniel Thayer Kidder and Henry Lee Shattuck.

    The Society adopted the following resolution:

    Francis Russell Hart

    THE Colonial Society of Massachusetts suffered a severe loss in the death on January 18, 1938, of Francis Russell Hart.

    He was born by the sea in New Bedford, and for most of his life he was connected with and influenced by the sea. He was a large man, physically and mentally, and his outstanding characteristics of gentleness and simplicity were those of a large man. Upon graduating from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1889, he began the practice of his profession of engineer at Cartagena on the coast of Colombia, South America, at one of the mouths of the Magdalena River, whence he accomplished the difficult task of railroad building into the interior. This marked his first acquaintance with the Caribbean countries, with which he was to be connected for most of his life. This engineering experience led to his intimate knowledge of the Spanish Main and West Indian waters which compelled his interest and led him to write Admirals of the Caribbean (Boston, 1922), The Disaster of Darien (Boston, 1929), and The Siege of Havana, 1762 (Boston, 1931).

    Finally settling in Boston, he became Treasurer of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and placed the finances of that notable institution upon a sound, adequate, and expanding basis. He left his imprint upon the financial history of Boston by becoming associated with one of its largest and most successful banking institutions. Shortly before his death he was elected President of the United Fruit Company.

    His interest in the Colonial Society of Massachusetts never flagged, and he was a generous friend of many good causes. He was absolutely unspoiled by his varied successes in life, and his friends, who were legion, always found him charming, helpful, and sincere.

    Resolved: that this tribute be spread upon the records of the Society and that a copy be sent to Mrs. Hart.

    Mr. Henry J. Cadbury read the following paper:

    Quaker Relief during the Siege of Boston

    NONPARTISAN war relief for civilians carried on by the Society of Friends in recent years, first in northern France, Serbia, and Russia, then in Germany and Austria, and most lately in both Nationalist and Loyalist Spain, is widely known and understood. But not even the Quakers themselves are aware of how exact precedents their history contains for such expressions of their pacifism in wartime. One of these examples, having to do with Revolutionary Massachusetts, has sufficient interest to deserve fuller record than it has yet received.

    The sources are unusually full and clear. The executive bodies of two of the larger units of American Quakerism were involved: in New England, the Committee (later called the Meeting) for Sufferings of New England Yearly Meeting; in Pennsylvania, the Meeting for Sufferings of Philadelphia Yearly Meeting. The correspondence between them is entered in full in the manuscript minute books of each of these bodies.69 In the Philadelphia Quaker archives are to be found, further, not only the originals of the letters received and the rough drafts of letters sent, making a third set of the official correspondence, but a very full, detailed account of the three thousand families ministered to.70 Furthermore, personal correspondence of those most active among both the contributors and the distributors is available: for John Pemberton and his brothers, in the Pemberton Papers at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, and for Moses Brown of Providence, in the Moses Brown Papers at the Rhode Island Historical Society.

    * * * *

    The shadow of the Revolutionary War fell upon the Society of Friends long before the actual outbreak of hostilities. The dispute between Parliament and the colonies was carried on in a way that Quakers early anticipated could end only in irreconcilability and fighting. As long-established pacifists they were convinced that war was inconsistent with Christianity, and they deplored every step toward war taken on either side. Like their fellow citizens, they were doubtless divided in their sympathies as to the rights of the case. Their law-abiding instinct tended to brand as usurpation the illegal proceedings of the revolutionary party. At the same time their freedom-loving instinct made them chafe at the loss of civil liberties. Through years of passive resistance in the previous century they had learned to rely for relief on outwearying their opposers by patience and forbearance. The results had seemed to justify their method. Now, therefore, they attempted the extremely difficult task of remaining neutral as far as military measures were concerned, aiming to keep themselves free from implication of military assistance on either side.

    There were, of course, members of the Society of Friends who could not resist the pressure of circumstances about them and who, whether because of self-interest, outside coercion, or inner fervor of loyalty either to the mother country or to the cause of freedom, did not follow the difficult path of the nonbelligerent. The official position—generally misunderstood on both sides—was, of course, weakened by these backsliders. In their care for these, in their attempt to remain firm in their chosen course, in the many difficult problems of consistent extension of pacifism to new situations, the leaders of the Quakers had plenty to occupy their attention—not to mention the wartime economic difficulties which they shared with all their neighbors. In addition it may be noted that it was just in these years of outward stress that they were bringing to a conclusion that long campaign of education and appeal to conscience by which they finally completely purified their membership of the holding of slaves.

    It would have been natural if these difficulties had seemed sufficient to excuse them from participation in general services of public relief. Inevitably their own position, so acute and hard to carry through, preoccupied their minds. They were able, however, to feel anxiety for and sympathy with their fellow members elsewhere on this continent: anxiety for their faithfulness to Quaker principles, and sympathy with their sufferings. Furthermore, as the Anglo-American Quaker correspondence of the period shows, at the outset of the troubles and all through the war they could count on the solicitude and most cordial support of the large and influential body of Friends in Great Britain who up to the last moment were concerned for a just and peaceful settlement of affairs between that country and the colonies.

    The retaliatory measures of the British ministry after the Boston Tea Party were easily understood in their intention to ruin that town’s commerce. The seriousness of the Boston Port Bill, signed March 31, 1774, to go into effect on June 1, was appreciated everywhere. In the latter month the Boston Overseers of the Poor were designated to receive the donations that might come in for relief purposes, and in July they were, at their own request, succeeded by a committee of twenty-six which included John Adams, Samuel Adams, John Rowe, Dr. Joseph Warren, and Josiah Quincy. The correspondence of that committee shows the extent and earnestness of the concern for the actual physical sustenance of the beleaguered town.71

    The eyes of Quakerdom also were concentrated on New England, at first upon its own members there. The London Yearly Meeting, writing in July, 1774, to Philadelphia, while expressing their assurance that Friends there would be loyal to their peaceable principles, added: “We cannot forbear looking around through the flock and family professing in some parts of America with a degree of anxious concern that none be led aside to their own hurt and grief of their brethren by yielding to that unsettling restless spirit.”72 A few months later (November 4) they wrote again to Philadelphia: “We look towards our Brethren in and near to New England with tenderness and commiseration and have found it in our hearts to salute them in a few lines as a short memorial of our regard and desires for their welfare.”73 At the same time London Friends urged those in Philadelphia and elsewhere to visit those in New England. This message Philadelphia Friends copied and forwarded to several of the meetings in New England.74

    The advice from London to American Friends to concern themselves about Friends in New England was hardly needed. Philadelphia Friends were already in touch with the situation. In fact, in October, 1774, one of them was actually on the spot: John Pemberton of Philadelphia. With his brothers James and Israel, sons of the late Israel Pemberton, he was among the most influential Quakers of Philadelphia at the time. Not only had he business connections in many places, but, as clerk of the Meeting for Sufferings, he was the center of a wide correspondence.

    According to the prevailing custom of religious intervisitation among Friends, which did so much for their solidarity,75 he had already visited the meetings in New England in 1762 and in 1769. Now he was traveling primarily as companion to Mary Leaver, a timid visitor from England. That he knew the serious situation he was likely to meet is plain from a letter written to a correspondent in the West Indies just before he left home: “The public papers will give thee as full an account of the political affairs to the Northward as I am able; private letters contain little more. The New England men seem determined to stand their ground to the last. They hitherto avoided hostilities, which is prudent, but keep themselves ready for any emergency.”76 His letters to his wife make it possible to follow him and his English companion through Trenton, New York, Newport, Nantucket, New Bedford, Boston, and Providence.77 Writing her from Providence on November 20 about a visit he had paid at Boston, he tells her to

    . . . acquaint brother Israel that a committee was appointed at the monthly meeting at Boston, to inspect into the situation of Friends in that place and whether they stood in need of assistance. Inclosed is names of heads of families and a few notes taken from information obtained by inquiry.78 Friends at Lynn and Salem are well able to assist all that is needful, divers being in very good circumstances but they have had so few calls for money that how they may be prevailed with to freely part with some I know not. Their situation has been urged, and the duty of manifesting brotherly sympathy and not only to Friends, but if the Calamity continue, that Friends would not be unfeeling respecting the people there more generally. I do not find that Friends are as yet much (or greatly affected). Our Friend, E. Pope says that last summer he had but little to do, the people appearing determined not to get new cloaths until meer necessity obliged them. He has now plenty of work. There are too many I find take advantage of the times & withhold paying their debts, that on this account some may suffer inconvenience. But there is a rumor of there being a likelyhood of a change of measures, which if so, may be esteemed a providential interposition.

    Provisions are very plenty in Boston, very good and in general cheaper than with us. If any suffer it appears most like to be such housekeepers, who had used to live tolerably well and by their little trade made both ends meet. The bounties sent them seem most likely to be applied to those of a lower rank. The town has plenty of English goods.79

    Writing again to his wife ten days later from Newport, Pemberton says:

    If any money is to be raised for the people in Boston by Friends, Henry Lloyd of that place in conjunction with Ebenezer Pope and Elizabeth Orrick would in my estimation and Moses’80 be most likely to distribute it properly. She is a lively active sensible woman and well acquainted with the people. Such who are in middling circumstances or formerly made a shift to live are most like to be affected though I cannot apprehend there is yet any necessity to hasten the matter, and brother Israel’s sentiments I believe truly just that it would not do to put it into the hands of the present committee to distribute, who are it’s thought most likely to favor the violent party.81

    The last words make clear the great difficulty of nonpartisan relief in wartime. That the Committee of Donations in Boston was partisan no one can doubt; and the same was of course true of the Committee of Correspondence appointed in May in Pennsylvania. The people of Boston, they declared, were “suffering in the general cause.”82 By the time of Pemberton’s reference the contributions from the city of Philadelphia alone had reached “about two thousand pounds.”83 The atmosphere that had prevailed there from the outset of the crisis is revealed in an anonymous letter written on June 2 giving an account of the way Philadelphia observed the going into effect of the Boston Port Bill: “Yesterday we had a pause in the business of the city, and a solemn pause it indeed was. If we except the Friends, I believe nine tenths of the citizens shut up their houses. The bells were rang, muffled, all the day, and the ships in the port had their colors half hoisted.”84

    The Friends of Philadelphia from the first strenuously dissociated themselves from this public expression. They regularly objected to public fasts; and they objected now to the implication that the meeting of citizens at which this particular demonstration was arranged represented Friends at all. The following statement, prepared two days before this display of public sentiment, presents their views:85

    Observing in the Pennsylvania Packet of this day, a notification, “that a number of persons composed of the members of all societies in this city, met and unanimously agreed, that it would be proper to express their sympathy for their brethren at Boston, by suspending all business on the first day of the next month;”—the people called Quakers though tenderly sympathizing with the distressed, and justly sensible of the value of our religious and civil rights, and that it is our duty to assert them in a Christian spirit, yet in order to obviate any misapprehensions which may arise concerning us, think it necessary to declare, that no person or persons, were authorized to represent us on this occasion; and if any of our community have countenanced or encouraged this proposal, they have manifested great inattention to our religious principles and profession, and acted contrary to the rules of Christian discipline established for the preservation of order and good government among us.

    Signed on behalf and at the desire of the Elders and Overseers of the several meetings of our religious Society in Philadelphia, and other Friends met on the occasion, the 30th of the Fifth Month, 1774.

    John Reynell

    James Pemberton

    Samuel Noble

    The Continental Congress, meeting in Philadelphia during these autumn months, made the difficulty and anxiety of the Friends none the less. They were sympathetic enough with the objects of protest, but, as they wrote in July to their friends in London, they could not countenance “measures proposed for the support of Civil Liberty which are not dictated by wisdom from above which is pure, peaceable and gentle.”86

    Writing again on November 5, they refer to the address made by the Congress in the name of all the provinces and assure their British brethren that

    it remains to be our desire to support our Christian testimony and with sincerity and integrity to guard against any of our members entering into measures inconsistent therewith and lest our contributing to the relief of the distressed people of Boston should subject us to be considered as approvers of their conduct we have from this and other considerations hitherto declined administering to them what on the principles of benevolence and charity we may hereafter find necessary.87

    While John Pemberton was himself in Rhode Island, his brother Israel was in correspondence with Moses Brown, asking how Philadelphia Quakers could assist people in Boston and urging Rhode Island Friends to visit the Bostonians. Evidently the difficulty of separating Quaker relief at Boston from the spirit of belligerency there seemed to him both difficult and important.88

    Doubtless not all Friends shared this insight. It is possible, for example, that some in New England itself did not. The need was great—simple human need—and if sympathizers contributed individually or anonymously and not as Friends, it could be argued that there was no compromise with Quaker principles. At any rate one notes with interest that almost the largest single entry in the list of donations received from the Province of Massachusetts Bay by the Committee of Donations in Boston is one of £90 9s on April 10, 1775, described as “from persons unknown (supposed to be the Friends Society at Nantucket).”89

    At Salem and Lynn, as at Providence and Nantucket, there were Friends able to be of service to Boston Quakers. In November, 1774, Salem Monthly Meeting appointed a committee to look into the matter, and upon receiving their report a month later that help was needed, ordered assistance to be given, and in March, 1775, directed £8 to be contributed.90 At the same time the committee notified John Pemberton in Philadelphia of what they had done, adding:

    by further inspection since we find that there are several Friends in Boston that stand in need of some further assistance by reason of their Imploy failing. . . . Now it is our judgment that there is more need of assistance to Friends in Boston at this time than has been some time past by reason of the difficulties that yet remain in those parts and we think that Friends here are concerned for to administer further assistance according to their ability.91

    Similar information respecting Friends in Boston was conveyed by the Salem committee to Moses Brown at Providence, who, in passing it on to John Pemberton, says (March 24, 1775): “I laid it before our preparative meeting and it is to be brought forth as Business to the Monthly Meeting next week, Friends thinking it best to do what is done for them as a Meeting and not as private Members.”92

    On receipt of this information the Meeting for Sufferings in Philadelphia drafted a letter (May 18, 1775) to the Yearly Meeting in New England urging them to arrange a subscription among themselves for the relief of those who were in want or suffering, adding the request “that we may be speedily and particularly acquainted with your situation and the steps you are about to pursue that if the calamity prevailing should make it necessary we may join our endeavors with yours in contributing to their assistance.”93 At the same time the Meeting for Sufferings advised that a permanent executive committee be established by the New England Yearly Meeting. This was done in June, 1775. It seemed at last to provide a suitable channel for truly nonpartisan and nonmilitary relief. From then on the chief service to Friends in Massachusetts was carried on by collaboration of the Meeting for Sufferings in Philadelphia and the Committee for Sufferings in New England.

    Information received in Philadelphia about conditions in Boston was not encouraging. Jeremiah Hacker of Salem reported from Newport to John Pemberton (June 14, 1775) that “by the Friends that have of late moved out we understand that . . . they are deprived of many of the comfortable things of this world as fresh provision, milk and [ ] both of which they used to abound. But have a sufficiency of bread and salt provision.”94 Two prominent Philadelphia Friends, John Hunt and Nicholas Waln, attended the Yearly Meeting in Rhode Island in June. Their report and the letter they brought from New England Friends galvanized the intention of relief into action. A form of appeal addressed “To Our Friends and Brethren of the Several Meetings of Pennsylvania and New Jersey” was drafted and printed, together with a subscription blank. It appealed for money to be raised in each local meeting and sent by the local collector to either of the two treasurers of the Yearly Meeting, John Reynell of Philadelphia and Samuel Smith of Burlington. The money was for relief of their “fellow subjects in the Province of the Massachusetts Bay and the adjacent provinces” and was to be administered by the newly appointed committee of New England Yearly Meeting to “the necessitous of every religious denomination.”95 On this last point considerable emphasis was laid in the correspondence, as also on the desire that the distribution should not in any way promote warlike measures inconsistent with Quaker principles. “Without the knowledge or approbation” of the authors96 this paper was published by the newswriters, not only in Philadelphia but also in New England and England.97 This raised the hopes of the beneficiaries but exposed the Friends to misunderstandings98 which they were at pains to remove. The New England Friends, before any of the money had reached them, repeatedly mentioned “the jealousies which have arose or may arise in the minds of any that it is designed or applied to any other than charitable purposes.”99 They were anxious to know whether the donors meant to “make no distinction of religious sect or political party,” it being already clear “from the misconstructions of your charitable intentions that care will be greatly increased in order to stop the mouths of the censorious of both parties.”100

    As records of the local meetings in New Jersey and Pennsylvania show, the subscription was undertaken heartily and promptly, and by November there was available more than £2,000, worth in New England currency £1,572 9s 4d. Its transmission to New England raised a problem, but two members of the Philadelphia committee, David Evans and John Parrish, were persuaded to take a sum of £1,600 in person and deliver it to Friends in New England.101 They met the New England Committee for Sufferings at Providence on November 21, delivered the money, and were back in Philadelphia on November 29.102

    In response to the inquiries of New England Friends the donors specified their intentions as to the money transmitted:

    We are in hopes if soon distributed [the money] will be an acceptable relief for the present to many poor people who by the Calamitous circumstances of your country are reduced to great streights and difficulties, and if you find the distribution of a further sum will be more seasonable and serviceable to such before the winter than at a further time and can obtain the money there by bills drawn on us we desire you to inform us as the risk of sending it will thereby be saved as also the difficulty we find in procuring specie suitable for the purpose. . . .103

    It is not our intention to limit the distribution to the Members of our own or any other Religious Society nor to the place of their present or former residence. It seems probable many who never lived in Boston may be as proper objects as those who have. . . . And we believe it will be expedient to keep a particular Acct of the Names of all who may partake, of their Occupations, number of the children, such as have any, the present and former place of their residence with such other circumstances as you can collect, and particularly of what religious Society they are, by which misrepresentations may be obviated.104

    This generous and voluntary action on the part of Philadelphia Quakers, although it is not mentioned, appears to me to be reflected in the surprisingly liberal resolution passed by the Second Continental Congress at just this juncture. Meeting in Philadelphia on July 18, 1775, the Congress seems to put its imprimatur on the Quakers’ “moral equivalent for war” when it says:

    As there are some people, who, from religious principles, cannot bear arms in any case, this Congress intend no violence to their consciences, but earnestly recommend to them, to contribute liberally in this time of universal calamity, to the relief of their distressed brethren in the several colonies, and to do all other services to their oppressed Country, which they can consistently with their religious principles.105

    At this point it may be well to note the information which Philadelphia Friends had received of circumstances in Boston. The first act of the Committee for Sufferings in New England had been to appoint some Friends to visit Friends in Boston.106 The report sent to Philadelphia is quite explicit:

    They went into the town by water from Lynn. . . . Upon their first coming into the presence of the Admiral [Graves] and making known their business he frowned upon them, and said he had been informed, that Friends had taken up arms against the King, and that there was a regiment rais’d at Philadelphia and were come or coming to fight against them, but being told by Friends they believed it was not so, but only a few of the looser sort had gone with some who never were of our Society, and that they believed such were testified against by Friends, as had been the case in our parts respecting two who had gone out that way. After which the Admiral appeared satisfied. . . . We also inform that most of the Friends who are in Boston and those who are come out are in low circumstances in the World.107

    Somewhat later the Pembertons received news of Boston Friends from William Rickman of New York City: “Two Friends of this place having been eastward called at Boston and are lately returned. They say the few Friends in that town being only four families are treated kindly, have liberty of leaving the town if they incline and Friends of Rhode Island are allowed free ingress and egress as oft as they choose.”108

    In August the Friends in New England had little to report though they promised to inquire into the situation of both the inhabitants of Boston and those who had come out. “The inhabitants of Boston, Charlestown and other places on the Sea Coast sufferers by the present troubles are so distributed over New England that such a knowledge of the Circumstances of the needy as to select the most worthy objects for your charity is a work of some difficulty and will require time.”109

    On September 12, 1775, the New England Committee wrote to the Philadelphia Meeting for Sufferings:

    As we hinted to you from our last meeting that we would make inquiry concerning the people who have been or were then inhabitants of Boston that are by the present commotions brought to needy circumstances and then inform you about them, we have made some inquiry and find that at the first of the 5th month the congress of the Massachusetts made provision for about five thousand people who were then in Boston desiring to come out, but not able to remove themselves; by which we think some intelligence may be gathered how many there are in difficult circumstances. Whether they are all got out or not we cannot tell but apprehend they mostly are and dispersed in that and the neighboring Governments with great numbers of others removed from Charlston, Roxbury, Marblehead and several other towns on the Sea Coast. And although the congress have proportioned the number mentioned to have been in Boston to the several towns to be by them took care of and supported, yet we dont find that application has been made to many of those towns by any such sufferers but in general those who have come out and left their effects behind are supported by the hospitality of their friends in that and the neighboring colonies. . . . Yet we find a number of other societies in several towns we apprehend objects within the intention of the benevolent in your parts to assist. . . .

    Whether it will be best to go into Boston or put into the hands of Friends and others there to distribute what we may think necessary or you may direct is a matter best left to the time of distribution as circumstances are almost daily altering. . . .

    Friends in Boston have not been visited by us since our last account and we have had no other account from them than what we received by Ezra Collins who is gone to your parts and may give you a more particular account than we are able to do at this time.110

    In November, when the money was actually in their hands, the New England Friends were doubtful whether they could distribute it to the inhabitants of Boston as soon or as satisfactorily as they had desired, having been informed that there was no passing in or out but by way of flags of truce from the commanding officers.111 They decided, however, to try and selected five of their number to carry out the plan, providing them with similar letters to both General Washington and General Howe:

    From our Meeting for Sufferings of the people called Quakers, held at Providence, 21st of Eleventh Month, 1775.

    To General Washington

    As visiting the fatherless and the widows, and relieving the distressed, by feeding the hungry and clothing the naked, is the subject of this address; we cannot doubt of thy attention to our representation and request in their behalf.

    The principle of benevolence and humanity exciting our brethren in Pennsylvania and New Jersey to contribute and send to our care a considerable sum of money, to be distributed among such sufferers as are by the present unhappy difficulties reduced to necessitous circumstances, without distinction of sects or parties, provided they are not active in carrying on or promoting military measures, (so that our religious testimony against wars and fightings may be preserved pure); and we being sensible there are many such within as well as without the town of Boston,—and being desirous of finding those that are most needy there as well as without, desire thy favourable assistance in getting into the town,—that they may be visited and relieved in such manner at the bearers thereof, Moses Farnum, Isaac Lawton, David Buffum, Theophilus Shove, Jr., and Jeremiah Hacker, whom we have appointed a committee for that service, may think proper; and when their Christian services are accomplished, to be allowed to return to their families in safety.

    Sorrowfully affected with the present calamaties, and feeling an engagement on our minds so to demean ourselves, as becomes those who profess to walk humbly and peaceably with all men,

    We are

    Thy Friends112

    There was some delay owing to illness and other causes, and it was not until December 13 that the party set out. The personnel was somewhat different from that originally intended and now included as perhaps the most active member Moses Brown of Providence.113

    Born in 1738, the youngest of four notable sons of James and Hope (Power) Brown of Providence, he had grown up a member of the Baptist Church and had joined the Society of Friends only in 1773. But he well understood the Quakers’ principles and had accepted their views on war and slavery, having already emancipated his slaves before undertaking to change his church membership. He had amassed sufficient fortune to retire from business and now at the age of thirty-seven was nearing the beginning of a long career of public-spirited philanthropy. For the expedition at hand he had the further advantage of having recently been in the beleaguered town of Boston on an even more delicate and difficult mission. His own brother, John, had been held a prisoner by the British, being rightly suspected of having been the ringleader in the burning of the armed schooner Gaspee. Moses Brown, quick as always to help his older brothers in their troubles, had successfully pleaded for John’s release, giving pledges of his good behavior which were to prove embarrassing enough, and had carried him home to Providence. He had evidently interviewed at that time only the British authorities, for on his return home he wrote to James Warren (May 11, 1775):

    My religious principles, thou art, I presume, sensible, does not admit of my interfering in war, but my love for my country and sense of our just rights is not thereby abated, and if my poor abilities could be any way subservient to a happy change of affairs nothing on my part shall be wanting. I had thoughts of coming to Cambridge &c, and giving you some account of affairs, and the disposition I found the people in at Boston, having a considerable opportunity with the principal officers of the army and navy as well as the Selectmen. But the fatigues of such a disagreeable errand weighed strong to bring me home to my family and friends who were anxiously waiting our return.114

    Moses Brown, accompanied now by Benjamin Arnold, David Buffum, Thomas Steere, and Thomas Lapham, Jr., reached Cambridge on December 14. Though kindly received in person by General Washington, they were refused permission to enter Boston; but Washington suggested that they meet certain of their friends in Boston at the lines.115 Even this was refused by General Howe, and they had to content themselves with sending into the town to two Friends there, Ebenezer Pope and James Raymor, a draft for £100 with the promise of more money if needed. The draft, however, proved unavailing as Henry Lloyd, the merchant on whom it was drawn, was not in funds to pay it, and any alternative method of getting money into the town did not appear.116 Evidently the Friends themselves in Boston were not very anxious to undertake the delicate task and were not impressed with the need. The New England Committee reported to the Philadelphia Meeting on March 12, 1776: “The draft sent into Boston was not paid, which as it appears by our Friends’ letters and verbal accounts they were rather satisfied with, as they decline the task of distributing the monies under our limitations, saying ‘It having been a sufficient task to watch ourselves,’ &c., and further said it was not necessary to send them any monies at present they having some for present use to buy the necessaries of life.” “There is a gleam of hope,” they continue, “that that devoted town may again be open for its dispers’d inhabitants to go in and out. But we cannot rely upon the present prospect, the scene of things are at this juncture so precarious and uncertain.”117

    In less than a week Howe had evacuated the town, and in forwarding to John Pemberton the above-quoted epistle Moses Brown could write (March 20):

    Inclosed our Epistie from our Meeting for Sufferings. Since which the troops hath left Boston and the fleet is down below the Castle. I have heard of our Friends James Raymor and Ebenezer Pope have been seen well in the Streets. . . . I would inform that by the account I have had there are many there left in the very poor indigent as well as otherwise distressed condition, the soldiery having made great destruction by plundering &c notwithstanding General Howe’s issuing a proclamation making it death to do so.118

    At the same time Moses Brown explained that the New England Committee had allocated for distribution elsewhere all the funds received from Philadelphia, and offered to advance two or three hundred pounds of his own for use in Boston while waiting for advice about further contributions. This plan was not accepted, but a balance of £100 was ordered sent at once to Boston, and word was soon received of further funds available.119 Writing on June 15 from Newport, the Committee for Sufferings explains:

    The small pox being in Boston and the unsettled state of the town for sometime after its being open prevented the committee that had the money for that town going through it and therefore they distributed what was on hand elsewhere, except about £30, and they now inform that the number of poor there within the intention of the donation according to accounts received was too large to make distribution of so small a sum amongst.

    They therefore instructed Moses Brown, their treasurer, to draw the whole additional sum (£500) available.120

    The actual distribution of money within Boston thus became one of the smallest and latest parts of the committee’s labors. The refugee problem outside of Boston proved a much more urgent and feasible undertaking. As the scope of this is given in statistical form in the reports printed in the Appendix, detailed description is unnecessary, though it is worth while to print here in full the beginning of the story, together with the account of the interview with Washington, as told in a letter of Moses Brown to William Wilson.121

    Providence First mo. 2d, 1776

    William Wilson, Beloved Friend,—

    Having this opportunity by water I thought of informing thee that we are generally in health, and to give thee a short history of a journey I made with four others, a committee from our meeting, to distribute your donations, the committee appointed when our Friends David Evans and John Parrish were here, not going by reason of sickness and other hindrances. Our Meeting for Sufferings renewed it, and we set off for the Eastward the 13th ultmo, reached Cambridge the 14th, and presented our Address to General Washington, a Coppy of which David Evans took with him.122 He received us kindly, but declined permitting us to go into Boston, saying he had made a rule not to let any go in, unless it was a woman seperated from her husband, or the like, but however showed a readiness to further the designed distribution, proposing to us to send in for some of our Friends to come out upon the lines, and giving us orders for a flag for a conference with them. As the small-pox was in town by inoculation generally, and only two of us had had it, our not being allowed to go in, seemed but a small or no disappointment. We sent General Howe a similar address to that delivered to General Washington, with a letter informing him of our not going in for the reasons above mentioned, and desiring his permission to let our Friends James Ramor and Ebenezer Pope meet us upon the lines, to whom we wrote under cover to the General, to which he answered,123 by his aid-de-camp, that our request could not be granted, but that he would direct the sheriff to meet and confer with us at any hour we should appoint. This at first seemed rather close upon us, but supposing he had his reasons for his conduct, as well as General Washington, we were easy, and embraced his proposals, and sending in my name to an officer with whom I had some acquaintance (Major Small, a kind humane man) he with the sheriff met us in the morning of the 15th; but the evening before, concluding the proper distribution uncertain and being unacquainted with the sheriff, wrote our Friends of our disappointment in not seeing them &c, and instead of the money sent in a draft for £100. Only after a conference, opening the intention of the donation, and benevolent intention of Friends therein, without regard to the promotion of parties as had been misapprehended, and finding a disposition in the sheriff to favor the intention, we proposed, if they thought a further sum could be usefully applied, agreeably to our purpose, we would send it in as we had it, but they declining to give us any opinion of the state of the poor, (only saying it was not so distressing as was represented without,) we referred the matter till we had accounts from our Friends, which they kindly offered their assistance to procure, after they had distributed the sum sent in and forward us out when done, which I now daily expect, having on our return wrote them in and spoke to the officer quartered at the advanced works to forward by the first opportunity.

    All around the two encampments is one scene of desolation. Fruit, range, and other trees, fences, &c some buildings, taken smooth away, the town of Cambridge so crowded, no lodgings to be had that we were obliged to lay by the fire uncovered, but with our own clothes, partly on the floor, and partly on an under bed of straw. This trial (new to me) seemed necessary to fit us for our journey, by giving a sympathy with those we had to visit, who had not the comforts of life.

    We got to Lynn on 7th day evening, being the 16th, stayed to meeting next day, and went to Salem. Friends of both places generally well. 18th, visited Marblehead, assembled the select men, and letting them into our business of visiting the poor, &c. Divided into three companies, a select man attending each, we went from house to house of the poor, seeing and enquiring their circumstances, and where need required, and they were within the intention of the donation, we relieved them, avoiding those families that did not come within as well as the guides could inform us. We found great poverty to abound; numbers of widows and fatherless, wood and provisions greatly wanting among them. Some poor women had to back the former two miles. An instance of this, was a widow woman with five children, and as she told us and indeed appeared daily looked to lie in with another, had been out in a cold day more than that distance for what she could bring, and had no bread in the house. She was one who we gladly relieved, but thou will not conclude all were objects of such commiseration. She appeared a tender-hearted woman indeed, she was contrited into tears at our visit, in which humble state we left the truly pitiable object,—for whom, I, at that instant, as at this time feel much, and when I have reflected upon the divers necessitous states, since have been so affected, as to conclude, had I not been favoured with an unusual fortitude and guard upon the affections, the service we went through would have been to hard to be born, but through favour we were preserved through the whole in a good degree of satisfaction, having sometimes a word of consolation, counsel, and admonition, occasionally arising. We visited this day, and helped between 60 and 70 families, mostly widows and children, among whom the donation hath hitherto principally fallen. Not finishing there, we left it to be done by Jeremiah Hacker and Samuel Collins.

    The next day, being the 19th, divided into four companies, a select man with each, and visited Salem, and in the afternoon, feeling a draught further eastward to Cape Ann, four of us, vizt Benjamin Arnold, David Buffum, Thomas Lapham, Jr., and myself, (leaving Thomas Steere to finish at Salem) set off, leaving on the way some relief. We got there the next day, being the 20th, at 10 o’clock. Assembling the selectmen and overseers, and giving them an account of our errand, we divided as before, one of them accompanying. The town being scattering, and seven or eight miles amongst the Extremities, we rode. The weather very cold and windy, however the calls of the poor were so strong, that we bore it with patience. Here it took us part of three days with attention. The general state of the poor here exceeded Marblehead, about half the most wealthy inhabitants having removed back in the country, leaving the poor unemployed, they were very necessitous, having before been poor, when the fishery was carried on—which being now wholly stopt. We here nor with you have very little idea of their poverty, yet their children seemed healthy, crawling even into the ashes to keep them warm. The wood usually coming by water, and now wholly stopt, they could keep but little fires for want of wood. Poverty and the want of teams in the place, obliged many to fetch it here, as at Marblehead, two miles by land. Bread, corn very scarce; 4s for Indian corn; no rye,—the last upward of 5s per bushel from Salem eastward. Some families no other bread but potatoes for some time, which with Checkerberry tea was seen the only food for a woman with a sucking child at her Breast. I hope not many so though I may say it hath been a sort of school to us, for we never saw poverty to compare with about 100 families in this town, who we visited and relieved, besides many poor not within the limits of our donation. By this time thou’l conclude your charities were in an acceptable time. Many were indeed of that mind, and expressed and some feelingly a sense of gratitude. The name Quaker though little known in these parts will be remembered and perhaps some may no more think it reproach. I have thought of John Woolman’s remark in his sickness of affluence relieving in times of sickness.124 This indeed was the case with some, for the lame, the aged and infirm was partakers of your liberality. An aged woman 96 or 97, husband upward of 80, with a maiden daughter, the support of her aged parents in times when business could be had, received with a sense of gratitude, which the silent tear bespoke of the contrition. Upon the whole I think, you may be satisfied and united that so far is well. May a sense of favours be upon us that we had had it in our power and been possessed of a heart to administer to the distressed, I mean the donors among you with our selves here.

    I was at Point Shirley about 4 miles from Boston, where there has been three loads of people landed from Boston.125 They were mostly dispersed, but found between 30 and forty families, who were relieved, another Friend, not having had the small pox, attended at another place in Chelsea, where were about 50 persons, that had been cleansed by smoking, most of which we made distribution to. My love to Friends with a communication of any part of this letter that may be acceptable.

    Moses Brown

    Although the first party thus returned within eighteen days126 to their homes, plans were made to revisit the same territory again and again and to extend the investigation of need more widely. Some money was retained in Philadelphia in the expectation that some of the refugees might travel even that far; some were assisted in Providence. The distribution extended to the north well along the coast to Casco Bay, inland to Worcester, and south as far as Plymouth, though the main recipients were refugees from Boston and Charlestown in the neighboring towns. As time went on, the committee received reports of serious difficulty in Newport, and some of the Philadelphia funds were sent there, especially for the purchase of firewood. The situation on Nantucket was also very difficult.

    Among other complications of the relief task was the refusal of many Friends to use the paper currency issued by the revolutionary government. In a letter to John Pemberton (Providence, April 30, 1776), Moses Brown explains the situation:

    Some Friends this way are concerned not to take it from a principle of its promoting the War, as well as on Acct of the authority making it, & I was thoughtful about the matter but having found in the course of Distribution of your Donation that the passing (at this time) hard money as effectually promoted it, I was constrained in my mind to hand paper in Lieu of it. A particular case was this. I was delivering the Selectmen of a Town, 50 miles from here some silver and while I was feeling in my pocket for some gold one spoke and said this made him think of the business of their town meeting (then just broke up) they had orders from the assembly to collect all the hard money they could for there was Accts come, that the Army in Cannady could not be supported with paper. On which I felt such a stop in my mind that I tho’t it best to hand the Remainder in paper, and to tell them that we could not exchange nor permit them to take (as he propos’d) any hard money for such uses, but desired that such as we left was delivered to the Individual, to which they readily agreed.127

    The contributions from Philadelphia Yearly Meeting were apparently closed and audited as early as September, 1776. The total given was £3,910 2sd. The records indicate how much was given by each Quarterly and Monthly Meeting.128 In New England some money had been raised even before the Philadelphia effort, and perhaps Friends of New York also assisted. There is some evidence that even the more southerly Yearly Meetings contributed.129

    In April, 1776, the Meeting for Sufferings in New England rendered a summary account of distributions to date amounting to £1,968 5sd lawful money, “which hath been distributed in 2157 sums to 1472 different persons and families; numbering in the whole 5220 persons.” But when the final account was received in Philadelphia sixteen months later, some of the totals were doubled, there being, according to the lists, 3,030 named families.130 Since each list gives, besides the name of the head of the family, the number of persons in it, the place of present and former residence, the occupation of the breadwinner, and the religious affiliation, a source of information is here provided unlike the usual rolls of the great and important with which historians and genealogists prefer to deal. Of the families more than eight hundred were those of widows. Since the Quakers or “friendly” people listed are extremely few,131 the distribution evidently followed the nonsectarian intention of the donors. How far it was possible to avoid discriminating on political grounds or assisting those who promoted military measures on either side one cannot tell. The lists, like the correspondence of the distributors, are eloquent of the extent of human need.

    It would be interesting to compare the lists of recipients with other evidence as to the names of the refugees from Boston. The great sums of money raised earlier in the colonies to help those in need as a result of the Boston Port Bill do not seem to have received so detailed an accounting. As the Quakers reported, many refugees were expected to be helped by the towns to which they had gone. There are two local lists which make an interesting comparison. One is entitled “The Names of Some of the Persons belonging to Boston and Charleston, who were relieved and assisted at Reading by the Town, in 1775.” There are about sixty of these “donation people,” several of whose names also appear later as recipients of Quaker relief.132 Similar, though briefer, is the list of “The Families and the number in each family which came from Boston to the Town of Concord as Donation Poor from Boston.”133 But the Quaker relief workers do not mention Concord. The towns in which they made the largest number of distributions were Lynn, Salem, Marblehead, Manchester, Marshfield, and Hingham, Massachusetts; Portsmouth and Newcastle, New Hampshire; Falmouth, Maine; and, later, Boston itself and Newport.

    Automatically the situation gradually improved as the scene of war shifted elsewhere. Already in April, 1776, the Friends in New England wrote to Philadelphia: “Hearing of the distressed situation of the poor people in New York and the Southern Colonies, we can say but little to encourage a further sum to be sent this way, more than to give you a general account that there remain great numbers very poor and needy.”134 It was reported to the Meeting for Sufferings in New York in February, 1777, that some of the money raised in Philadelphia “for the relief of the necessitous in and about Boston” was available for like purpose in New York. The Meeting accepted the offer and undertook to raise funds also in their own meetings.135 In 1777 Philadelphia exchanged roles with Boston as to being occupied by the British. I find no evidence that Massachusetts contributed to relieve the sufferings in the Quaker city.136 For them, help was offered from another quarter: English Friends sent ships of provisions to various American ports, and in the spring of 1778 a donation of £2,000, Irish money, was put at the disposal of Philadelphia Quakers by their brethren in Ireland. This, however, they spent mainly on cases of need at a distance, such, for instance, as the frontier parts of South Carolina and Georgia. The war ended with a considerable amount of English and Irish relief money still unexpended, which Anthony Benezet, when he died in 1784, was trying to secure for the relief of Negroes unlawfully held in bondage or in other circumstances of special need.137

    That the recipients in New England appreciated the Quaker relief is most likely and is in fact attested by the reports of the distributors. The difficulty of the task was quite recompensed in the minds of these latter by the appreciation of those to whom they ministered. The gratitude was doubtless private rather than public, although in the records of the town of Salem for December 29, 1775, and May 18, 1776, stand votes of thanks to the Friends.138 Apparently the histories of neither Boston, the Siege of Boston, nor the Revolution in New England make reference to this episode. There is no evidence that Moses Brown’s forecast was correct when he said: “The name Quaker though little known in these parts will be remembered and perhaps some may no more think it reproach.”139 Experience of more recent years shows that when men have once adopted the way of the sword, they have little real understanding of neutral benefactions and short memories of gifts prompted by a spirit which in other circumstances might seem to them suggestive of a better way.

    Appendix

    No. 1. Contg the list of near 150 Donations to Families whose numbers make upwards of 400 persons being the Inhabitants of Marblehead Salem Gloucester & Manchester & the dispersed inhabitants of Boston & Charlestown amounting to £120 8s 6d

    Date Names Town now in Removed from No. of Childn. Relig. Profess. Occupation Sums

    1775

    12th Mo.

    5th

    Lucy Wilson an aged W.140

    Providence

    Boston

    P.

    Schoolmistress141

    £1

    10

    Catharine Whitamore W.

    2

    B.

    1

    10

    18th

    Hannah Curtis W.

    Marblehead

    2

    P.

    1

    Sarah Wigers W.

    P.

    10

    John Lows Wife

    2

    P.

    14

    Susannah Dennis & Two Daughters

    3

    P.

    18

    Elias Briars & Wife 70 year

    C.

    1

    Ailce Lee

    1

    P.

    10

    Deborah Codnar & Daugr

    1

    C.

    15

    Elizabeth Smith

    2

    P.

    18

    Elizabeth Wallan & Daugr

    1

    P.

    14

    Mary Rowles, aged W.

    3

    C.

    1

    Mary Smith aged W. 1 Child & 2 Grandchildn

    3

    P.

    1

    10

    Bulah & Hepsiba Brock 2 Twins abt 70 & their Sister Mary Fabins W.

    P.

    Schoolmistress

    2

    Ann Owens W.

    1

    P.

    1

    John Pearce & Wife

    P.

    15

    Lydia Robinson, her husband 8 mo. at Sea

    3

    C.

    1

    Richard Words Wife

    7

    P.

    Baker

    1

    10

    Elisabeth Flory W.

    4

    P.

    1

    10

    Sarah Clown W.

    P.

    10

    Saml Hitchens aged 89 Wife & Sister

    3

    P.

    Picker of Oakum

    15

    Peter Martin & Wife

    P.

    6

    Jean Clapman & Son

    1

    P.

    14

    Elisabeth Dodd W.

    5

    C.

    1

    10

    Ray Sampson W. with a very sick Child

    4

    P.

    1

    10

    Mary Brown, single Woman

    C.

    14

    Mary Bassett W.

    P.

    6

    Mary Lodge W.

    P.

    6

    Lydia Main W.

    1

    P.

    10

    Elizabeth Burrill W.

    1

    C.

    12

    Jean Poors W. with grandchildren

    3

    C.

    15

    £28

    12

    Date Names Town now in Removed from No. of Childn. Relig. Profess. Occupation Sums

    1775

    Brot forward

    £28

    12

    Abigail Dennis W.

    Marblehead

    P.

    10

    Elizabeth Groton W.

    P.

    10

    Mary Gray W.

    P.

    1

    1

    Mary English W.

    P.

    10

    Sarah Trevy W. & her aged Mother

    1

    P.

    1

    Rebeckah Bezun W.

    2

    P.

    10

    Elizabeth Chapman W. & her aged Mother of 80

    1

    P.

    1

    John Poor & Wm. Curtis 2 poor boys, beggers

    4

    Exchang’d for Bisket & Coppers for the poor Boys, 6s & 2s is

    8

    19th

    Rachel Comeins

    Salem

    1

    P.

    12

    Mary Hubbard, & Abigail Still W. & their aged Mother

    1

    P.

    1

    John Tink Wife

    1

    P.

    Carpenter

    12

    Rachel Erving W. & grandchildren

    3

    P.

    18

    Mary Leach W.

    1

    P.

    10

    Lydia Killey an aged W.

    P.

    12

    John Mugford Wife

    6

    P.

    Fisherman

    18

    Mary Hatham W.

    2

    P.

    1

    Edmund Munyan, Wife

    7

    P.

    8

    Mary Slewman, with a decrepit husband

    1

    P.

    1

    Mary Gottier W.

    P.

    10

    John Leach, Wife

    2

    P.

    10

    23d

    Sarah Merriott W.

    2

    P.

    6

    Abiah Eddy Daugr & grandchildren

    Charlestown

    2

    P.

    1

    10

    Henry Snow

    Boston

    P.

    Cabinetmaker

    1

    Thomas Giles Wife, he abroad

    5

    P.

    10

    Hannah Nichols W.

    1

    P.

    12

    20th

    Abraham Burril W.

    2

    P.

    6

    Andrew Standars Wife

    4

    P.

    4

    Abigail Stevens an aged W.

    P.

    6

    Patience Knights W.

    6

    P.

    8

    6

    Bethiah Adams W.

    3

    P.

    4

    Mary Harris aged W.

    P.

    8

    Ruth Buyinton W.

    3

    P.

    16

    Samuel Clark an aged Man

    P.

    18

    Bethiah Abbott W.

    4

    P.

    16

    Lowis Tarr W.

    3

    P.

    12

    Rebeckah Brock W.

    5

    P.

    18

    Joshua Kendal & Wife

    P.

    15

    Betty Kendall W.

    2

    P.

    15

    Martha Stevens W.

    3

    P.

    £54

    14

    6

    Date Names Town now in Removed from No. of Childn. Relig. Profess. Occupation Sums

    1775

    Brot forward

    £54

    14

    6

    Sarah Bray & S. Flagg W.

    Gloucester

    1

    P.

    6

    Elizabeth Hardy W.

    1

    P.

    1

    10

    Mary Steel W.

    6

    P.

    1

    10

    Enoch Rayer Wife

    7

    P.

    18

    Sarah Riges W.

    1

    P.

    12

    Martha Brock W.

    4

    P.

    1

    Deborah Griffin W.

    5

    P.

    1

    Patience Thompson W.

    P.

    14

    21st

    Unice Herridon W.

    3

    P.

    16

    Patience Chard Wife of Thos absent 3 years

    4

    P.

    1

    Abigail Godden Wife of Thomas who hath been absent 2 years

    1

    P.

    12

    Rachel Davis W.

    2

    P.

    12

    Joshua Norwood W.

    P.

    16

    Abigail Jumpper W.

    P.

    15

    Elizabeth Whaley W.

    2

    P.

    15

    Mary Riggs W.

    2

    P.

    6

    Lydia Gatwood W.

    2

    P.

    10

    Rachel How W.

    1

    P.

    10

    Sarah Allen W.

    3

    P.

    12

    Hannah Glover aged W.

    P.

    10

    22d

    John Shapton Wife

    4

    P.

    1

    Mary Johnson aged W.

    P.

    10

    Lydia Morgan W.

    P.

    12

    Benja Webber for his aged Mother

    P.

    12

    Hannah Davis W.

    3

    P.

    1

    4

    Mary Millit W.

    4

    P.

    1

    4

    Susannah Varrell W.

    P.

    1

    Betty Hammond W.

    P.

    1

    George Francis Wife

    4

    P.

    1

    10

    John Dunahue Wife

    4

    P.

    1

    4

    — Lufkin W.

    P.

    12

    Mary Jones with a father upwards of 80 & mother 96 or 7

    Manchester

    P.

    1

    10

    Lucy Andrews W. with a decrepit son

    4

    P.

    1

    John Britton Wife

    Marblehead

    5

    P.

    1

    26

    Moses Barron W.

    Point Shirley in Chelsea

    Boston

    P.

    Shoemaker

    15

    Nathaniel Mountford

    P.

    Writing master

    9

    Joseph Hoy

    P.

    Brazier

    9

    Ceaser Wendal & Wife, free Negros

    P.

    1

    8

    Rebeckah Spears, lost her husband on the point since she came out

    2

    P.

    1

    8

    £88

    5

    6

    Date Names Town now in Removed from No. of Childn. Relig. Profess. Occupation Sums

    1775

    Brot forward

    £88

    5

    6

    Elizabeth Orr, Orphan Girl of 14

    Point Shirley in Chelsea

    Boston

    P.

    6

    Temple de Coister & sister Fary 2 Children under 13 years

    P.

    3

    Elizabeth Thornton

    P.

    6

    Esther Esworthy W.

    P.

    6

    John Obray, Wife, french people with a Country woman

    R.

    18

    Sarah Bryant a Regulars W.

    P.

    12

    Benja Ross, Wife

    1

    B.

    Cabinetmaker

    15

    Ebenezer Goff & Wife

    P.

    Labourer

    6

    Elizabeth Farmer Wife of Wm left in Boston

    1

    P.

    12

    Magnis Tillock W.

    1

    P.

    15

    Nathl Cushing Offing Son of Nathl about 11 years

    P.

    1

    10

    John King Wife

    P.

    Butcher

    1

    6

    Elinor Boson W.

    P.

    6

    Lucy Malony wife of Michel

    1

    P.

    1

    Elias Cox, Wife

    2

    P.

    Shoemaker

    1

    Benja Burdit

    P.

    Shoemaker

    16

    William Vinal, Sister

    4

    P.

    formerly a Preacher

    1

    10

    Sarah Brown W.

    4

    P.

    1

    Mehitable Orange

    1

    P.

    1

    Sarah Usher, W. her husband dying the day he Landed on ye point

    P.

    1

    Israel Cowing Wife

    7

    P.

    Ship Carpenter

    2

    4

    Edward Edwards Wife

    4

    P.

    Tailor

    1

    8

    Priscilla Nebitters

    1

    P.

    Seamstress

    1

    Sarah Dunkinfield W.

    1

    P.

    Nurse

    1

    Elizabeth Manwaring W. her husband dying since she came out

    P.

    10

    Sarah Ingerfield W.

    2

    P.

    10

    Benja Goit W.

    2

    P.

    1

    Ann Goit W.

    2

    P.

    1

    Sarah Butt W.

    2

    P.

    Seamstress

    1

    12

    Hannah Hinks W.

    P.

    Seamstress

    1

    6

    Martha Tompson aged W.

    P.

    12

    James Collins

    2

    P.

    Carpenter

    12

    David Jenkins

    1

    Unity Knock & Wife

    Malden

    P.

    Shoemaker

    1

    James Newell Wife

    Charlestown

    1

    P.

    Potter

    1

    8

    Abigail Newel W.

    1

    P.

    14

    £120

    8

    6

    No. 2. Acct of Distributions in Marblehead, Salem, Manchester & Gloucester on Cape Ann, and to the Dispers’d Inhabitants of Boston & Charleston. 274 Donations—the Families Contg 838 persons

    Date Names Town now in Removed from No. of Childn. Relig. Profess. Occupation Sums

    1775

    18th

    Susannah Ashton W.

    Marblehead

    2

    P.

    £1

    12th Mo.

    — Furguson W.

    P.

    10

    Mary Glover W.

    P.

    10

    Sarah Lovis W. near 80

    P.

    1

    Esther Gabriel W.

    1

    C.

    12

    Sarah Neale W.

    2

    P.

    12

    Miriam Fryes W. 75

    1

    P.

    12

    John Vickril 89, & Wife 73

    C.

    1

    Mary Pierce W.

    P.

    18

    Rebecca Kinsman W.

    P.

    12

    Thos Felton & Wife

    6

    P.

    Blacksmith

    1

    Anna Rose W.

    4

    P.

    12

    Jane Gurley W.

    P.

    12

    Mary Canterbury W.

    C.

    12

    Abigail Williams

    1

    C.

    6

    Rebecca Johnson W.

    P.

    1

    Anna Jackson, her Husbd prest on bord M. war

    4

    P.

    1

    Ann Rush W.

    1

    C.

    12

    Deborah Cross W.

    C.

    1

    Deborah Bowden W. 65

    P.

    1

    Lydia Reed W.

    P.

    12

    Mary Lasgee W. & Daugr Dennis

    5

    5

    P.

    1

    Mary White W. & orphan Grandchildren

    3

    P.

    1

    19th

    Elisabeth Trask W.

    Salem

    P.

    12

    Mary Silsbee, a Maiden 84, & Jane Fling W.

    P.

    1

    10

    Mary Welman W.

    P.

    18

    Thos Masury & Wife

    4

    P.

    1

    Marcy Burk, Husbd cast away

    2

    P.

    12

    Hannah Cocks W.

    2

    P.

    12

    Rebecca Turner, Negro W.

    2

    P.

    10

    Benja Masury & Wife

    1

    P.

    11

    Paul Cahoon & Wife

    5

    P.

    6

    Robert Hooper & Mother

    P.

    9

    Sarrah Lemmon W.

    C.

    12

    Anna Matthews, husbd at Sea

    3

    C.

    9

    Sarah Nickelson, husd at Sea

    3

    C.

    1

    Abigail Puncheon, Maiden

    P.

    12

    Rebecca Patterson W.

    C.

    12

    Elisabeth Giles W. near 80

    P.

    1

    Wm Robinson & Wife

    Marblehead

    7

    P.

    Labourer

    1

    10

    Hannah Bully W.

    1

    P.

    1

    £31

    7

    Date Names Town now in Removed from No. of Childn. Relig. Profess Occupation Sums

    Brot forward

    £31

    7

    Hannah Brimblecom W.

    Marblehead

    1

    P.

    1

    Philip Hammon & Wife

    2

    P.

    Fisherman

    1

    Abigail Thompson W.

    6

    P.

    1

    10

    Margeret Craw W.

    1

    C.

    10

    Priscilla Jacobs W.

    3

    P.

    1

    Hepsebah Wurgey W.

    P.

    1

    Mary Hickey W.

    P.

    10

    Hannah Savery

    5

    P.

    1

    Mary Gorell W.

    1

    P.

    Weaver

    1

    Rebeccah Cane W.

    1

    P.

    10

    Elisabeth Cross W.

    3

    P.

    15

    Mary Hooper W.

    1

    P.

    15

    Elisabeth Gover, with an aged Mother

    Salem

    2

    P.

    12

    Margaret Heathy W.

    2

    P.

    1

    Lydia Cook W.

    P.

    10

    John Brown & Wife

    2

    P.

    1

    Elisabeth Millet & aged Mother

    3

    P.

    1

    10

    Abial Towser W.

    4

    P.

    10

    Lydia Valpey W.

    2

    P.

    10

    Desire White W.

    C.

    8

    Elisabeth Clark W.

    Boston

    1

    P.

    1

    Sam. Greenleaf & Wife

    Beverly

    3

    B.

    Hatter

    2

    Lydia Hodgkins & Anna Ellet

    Gloucester

    2

    P.

    1

    John Hase & Wife

    1

    P.

    12

    Susannah Scandelon W.

    3

    P.

    1

    Hannah Pery W.

    1

    P.

    6

    Rachel Allen W.

    P.

    6

    Sarah Day W.

    P.

    6

    Rachel Rich W.

    2

    P.

    6

    Jane Carter W.

    1

    P.

    8

    Anna Cloughlan W.

    3

    P.

    12

    Stephen Robinson & Wife

    7

    P.

    18

    Sarah Larvey W.

    1

    P.

    6

    Sarah Hunter W.

    1

    P.

    10

    Sarah Larvey W.

    5

    P.

    1

    Thomazem Smith W.

    4

    P.

    1

    Ruth Millet & Bethiah Jones Ws.

    1

    P.

    12

    Sarah Smith W.

    4

    P.

    1

    10

    Sarah Joseph W.

    5

    P.

    18

    Eunice Rennicom W.

    1

    P.

    12

    Susannah Sergant W.

    P.

    12

    Lydia Robinson W.

    P.

    6

    Martha Robinson W. with Sister

    1

    P.

    10

    Judith Knolton W.

    5

    P.

    1

    10

    £65

    17

    Date Names Town now in Removed from No. of Childn. Relig. Profess. Occupation Sums

    Brot forward

    £65

    17

    Mary Parsons W. & Mr. Parsons Cripples

    Gloucester

    P.

    Tailor

    12

    Anna Cartey W.

    2

    P.

    12

    8

    Susanna Parsons W.

    2

    P.

    12

    Joseph Leach & Wife

    Manchester

    P.

    1

    Abigail Galloway W.

    P.

    15

    Abigail Leach W.

    P.

    1

    Rachel Bennet W.

    2

    P.

    1

    Anna Bennet W.

    3

    P.

    1

    4

    Margaret Meloy W.

    Salem

    5

    P.

    1

    10

    Elisabeth Orsborn W.

    1

    P.

    Tailoress

    9

    Eleanor Thomas & Margaret Pitman

    2

    P.

    12

    Jacob Henly & Wife

    Boston

    1

    P.

    Blacksmith

    18

    Moses Day & Wife

    7

    P.

    Sailor

    6

    Robert Goodale, Wife, & several Children

    F.

    6

    Elisabeth Robinson W.

    Danvers

    Boston

    C.

    15

    James Phillips & Wife

    P.

    Rigger

    18

    Timothy Jervis & Wife

    Salem

    2

    P.

    1

    8

    Samuel Roles & Wife

    Danvers

    Marblehead

    5

    P.

    Sailor

    1

    4

    Mary Gipson W.

    Chelsea

    Boston

    3

    P.

    1

    8

    Jane Ledletter W.

    1

    P.

    10

    Hannah Hill W.

    1

    P.

    14

    Mary Jinckins W.

    3

    P.

    1

    Elisabeth Carpenter

    3

    C.

    1

    Mary Tucker

    P.

    8

    Elisabeth Robinson W.

    2

    B.

    18

    Susannah Joy W.

    2

    P.

    Tailoress

    1

    8

    Hannah Edwards W.

    P.

    10

    Timothy Call

    P.

    10

    Jonathan Abrahams & Wife

    4

    P.

    Blockmaker

    1

    8

    Christopher Christy & Wife

    2

    P.

    18

    James Christy & Wife

    P.

    Caulker

    14

    Alexander Shearly & Wife

    Noddle’s Island

    C.

    14

    Joseph True & Wife

    Boston

    5

    P.

    Carpenter

    1

    8

    John Ayers & Wife

    2

    P.

    18

    Elisabeth Payten

    2

    P.

    1

    John Jepson

    4

    B.

    Tailor

    1

    8

    Martha Dorcey W.

    3

    P.

    1

    Mehitable Sloper W.

    1

    P.

    8

    Mary Cloutman W.

    Salem

    4

    P.

    1

    Joseph Searl & Wife

    P.

    Tailor

    12

    Widow Martha Renew & Mother

    3

    P.

    1

    David Hillard wth an aged Mother

    7

    C.

    Ropemaker

    1

    10

    Sarah Cash (maid) & Nurse Littlefield

    P.

    1

    Jonathan Whitefoot

    P.

    Labourer

    12

    Abigail Whiley

    3

    P.

    15

    £105

    9

    8

    Date Names Town now in Removed from No. of Childn. Relig. Profess Occupation Sums

    Brot forward

    £105

    9

    8

    Joseph Lewis & Wife

    Salem

    Boston

    P.

    1

    Elisabeth Drisdale W.

    P.

    15

    Hannah Marshfield W.

    P.

    10

    Marcy Beadle W.

    P.

    16

    Susanna Right W.

    P.

    15

    John Batter’s Wife, he absent

    3

    P.

    1

    John Foot

    P.

    Labourer

    15

    Abigail Mussey W.

    1

    P.

    10

    John Arthur’s Wife, he absent

    2

    P.

    15

    Lydia Gulley W.

    Boston

    2

    P.

    1

    16

    Eunice Vail, Maiden

    P.

    12

    Mary Berry W.

    1

    P.

    10

    Elisabeth Foot & Daughter both Ws.

    1

    P.

    18

    Susanna Beadle W.

    5

    P.

    1

    10

    Sarah Brimblecomb (Husband absent)

    3

    P.

    1

    4

    Mary Cox W. & Sister Abigail Lasker, Maiden

    1

    P.

    18

    Mary Magrews W.

    1

    P.

    18

    Mary Cox W.

    1

    P.

    1

    David Lawson

    4

    C.

    Fisherman

    1

    John Walpey & Wife

    5

    P.

    Fisherman

    1

    Margaret Howard W.

    P.

    10

    James Collins

    P.

    Ship Carpenter

    10

    Abigail Curtis W. & Dautr weakly Maiden

    P.

    18

    Ruth Searl W.

    P.

    12

    Mary Whitefoot

    P.

    11

    Samuel Gavit & Wife

    2

    P.

    Labourer

    12

    Lydia Mileman W.

    P.

    10

    Susanna Phippen W.

    P.

    10

    Elisabeth Whitefoot (Husband absent)

    5

    P.

    1

    4

    Mary Larder W.

    P.

    12

    Joseph Gifford & Wife

    6

    C.

    1

    4

    To Sundries dld 5 poor Children belonging to Marblehead

    6

    8

    Johanna Farran, Maiden

    Boston

    P.

    12

    Mary Shaw, Maiden

    P.

    12

    Lydia Woodman

    4

    P.

    1

    —Whitefoot

    2

    P.

    12

    Hannah Wallus W.

    2

    P.

    15

    Jemima Porter W.

    1

    P.

    12

    Sarah Jerald W.

    P.

    10

    Bethia Trask W.

    3

    P.

    15

    Richard Lander & Wife

    6

    C

    Carpenter

    18

    £137

    17

    4

    Date Names Town now in Removed from No. of Childn. Relig. Profess. Occupation Sums

    Brot forward

    £137

    17

    4

    Mary Meacham IV.

    Salem

    P.

    10

    William Perry & Wife

    3

    P.

    Sailor

    18

    William Loftey & Wife

    P.

    15

    Hannah Roberson W.

    C.

    10

    Thomas Doyle & Wife

    3

    C.

    15

    Abigail Ramsdel (Husban absent)

    3

    P.

    12

    Sarah Briggs W.

    1

    C.

    10

    Lydia Elexander W.

    2

    P.

    Hannah Manning W.

    P.

    7

    6

    Elisabeth Whitefoot W.

    P.

    12

    Elisabeth Yell W. and Daughter Elisabeth W.

    2

    P.

    1

    Thomas Stephens’s Wife he abst

    4

    P.

    8

    Joseph Smith & Wife

    P.

    Fisherman

    12

    William Bene & Wife

    Boston

    P.

    15

    Mary Mires W.

    3

    P.

    12

    Hannah Sluman W.

    5

    P.

    12

    Abigail Cook W.

    P.

    6

    Elisabeth Mackertee W.

    4

    P.

    18

    William Liscomb & Wife

    1

    C.

    Mason

    10

    Hannah Clemons W.

    4

    P.

    14

    Elisabeth Bell W.

    2

    P.

    12

    Benjamin Bateman & Wife

    1

    P.

    Carpenter

    12

    Mary & Hannah Burchmore Ws.

    P.

    12

    Hannah Twist, Maiden

    P.

    9

    Lydia Macklemar

    2

    P.

    14

    Ruth Gutchel W.

    P.

    6

    Saml Mackentier & Wife

    6

    P.

    12

    Thomas Jonston & Wife

    Boston

    P.

    Cabinetmaker

    1

    Susanna Mussey W.

    2

    C.

    18

    Rubia White W.

    1

    P.

    12

    Mary Chamberlain W.

    Charlestown

    2

    P.

    18

    Mary Austin W.

    6

    P.

    1

    4

    Hannah Farrand W.

    Boston

    1

    P.

    17

    Thomas Horton

    2

    P.

    Labourer

    9

    Peter Herfield

    3

    P.

    Labourer

    9

    Mary Jackson W.

    Boston

    P.

    16

    —Grant W.

    P.

    8

    Marcy Lambert W.

    2

    C.

    16

    Martha Stephen W.

    P.

    12

    Samuel Masury

    P.

    Sailor

    15

    Sarah Adams W.

    Boston

    P.

    18

    Samuel Peters & Wife

    4

    P.

    18

    Elisabeth Amory W.

    P.

    10

    John Topp & Wife

    Boston

    P.

    17

    23d

    Hannah William W.

    3

    P.

    10

    Nathaniel Holdine & Wife

    4

    P.

    6

    £167

    18

    10

    Date Names Town now in Removed from No. of Childn. Relig. Profess. Occupation Sums

    Brot forward

    £167

    18

    10

    Sarrah Tarrant W.

    Salem

    1

    P.

    6

    Mary Welman W.

    6

    P.

    6

    Lydia Osborne (Husband at Sea)

    3

    P.

    15

    Lydia Mackentire W.

    P.

    6

    Mary Couch W.

    P.

    5

    Nathaniel Perkins & Wife

    P.

    6

    Simon Lamb & Wife & Aunt near 70

    3

    C.

    12

    Henry Tink & Wife

    5

    C.

    15

    Mary Hotham

    5

    P.

    10

    John Lutener & Wife

    2

    C.

    11

    Phillip Craw 70 years old

    P.

    6

    Hannah Frayzer W.

    3

    P.

    14

    John Leerock & Wife

    Boston

    5

    P.

    12

    Thomas Thornton Wife & Mother

    3

    P.

    15

    20th

    Nicholas Gougate & Wife

    Gloucester

    5

    R.

    Labourer

    1

    10

    Flura Doucite & Wife

    4

    R.

    Labourer

    1

    10

    —Brown W.

    6

    P.

    1

    10

    Thomas Winter

    6

    P.

    Caulker

    1

    Sarah Witham

    4

    P.

    6

    Hannah Elwell

    2

    P.

    Spinster

    6

    The Wife of John Gardenter

    P.

    6

    —Robinson W.

    P.

    6

    Widow Batten

    P.

    6

    Widow Corney

    P.

    6

    Solomom Howard

    P.

    12

    Widow Witham

    P.

    12

    Sarah Hadley W.

    P.

    7

    Sarah Row W.

    4

    P.

    18

    Widow Elwell

    P.

    12

    Mary Reel W.

    P.

    12

    Widow Caprin W.

    2

    P.

    12

    Anna Ellery W.

    3

    P.

    12

    Prudence Ellery W.

    P.

    6

    Widow Parsons

    3

    P.

    6

    Widow Indler

    2

    P.

    12

    Widow Allen

    P.

    9

    —Daniels

    2

    P.

    12

    William Babson & Wife

    P.

    12

    Widow Severy

    P.

    6

    Thomas Pellam

    2

    P.

    10

    Wife of Jona Coats

    P.

    5

    Andrew Grimes

    P.

    6

    21st

    Hannah Tar Wife of Caleb

    P.

    6

    Jemima Millett

    P.

    6

    Widow Glover

    2

    P.

    4

    Andrew Grimes &: Wife

    5

    P.

    1

    Jonathan Coats his Wife

    5

    P.

    6

    £193

    6

    10

    Date Names Town now in Removed from No. of Childn. Relig. Profess. Occupation Sums

    Brot forward

    £193

    6

    10

    Susanna Holland, Husband Prest a Board Man War

    Gloucester

    3

    P.

    12

    James Lane & Wife

    3

    P.

    12

    Jane Foster W.

    P.

    8

    William Robins & Wife

    P.

    8

    Susanna Ellwell

    1

    P.

    9

    Elisabeth Roe W.

    4

    P.

    1

    Mary Boynton

    4

    P.

    10

    Widow Brown

    P.

    6

    Lydia Davis W.

    1

    P.

    12

    Hannah Noble

    P.

    6

    274 Dona

    £198

    9

    10

    No. 3. Marblehead, Lynn & Point Shirley. 152 Donations the Families Contain 420 persons

    Names Town now in Removed from No. of Childn Relig. Profess. Occupation Sums

    1776

    12th Mo. 1

    Nicholas Girdler & Wife

    Marblehead

    1

    C.

    Fisherman

    £

    10

    Elener Dixen W.

    2

    C.

    12

    Anna Grow W.

    1

    P.

    10

    Rachel Pitman W.

    P.

    10

    Rebekah Clerk W.

    4

    P.

    15

    Sarah Pecket W.

    1

    P.

    5

    Grace Cammel (Husbd abst)

    3

    P.

    16

    Bethiah Waters W.

    C.

    7

    6

    Mary Lapthorn W.

    P.

    10

    Martha Gossear (Husbd abst)

    6

    C.

    18

    Elizabeth Davis W.

    C.

    10

    Sarah Taylor (Husbd absent)

    1

    P.

    6

    9

    Sarah Brown W.

    C.

    10

    Sarah & Mary Widger Ws.

    C.

    17

    Mary Farne (Husbd cast away)

    2

    C.

    15

    Sarah Brown (Husbd absent)

    3

    P.

    4

    Simson Bowden & Wife

    P.

    Shoreman

    12

    Judith Mardick W.

    P.

    11

    Mary Sammon W.

    C.

    10

    2

    Joseph Doliber & Wife

    1

    P.

    Fisherman

    14

    Rebekah Robinson W.

    3

    P.

    1

    Meream Ireson W.

    1

    P.

    11

    Sarah Stephens W.

    1

    P.

    11

    Ann Tefts W.

    P.

    15

    Mary Trevy W.

    P.

    10

    Jane Strong W.

    5

    1

    Deliverance Henly W.

    P.

    6

    ½

    Arthur Lloyd & Wife

    5

    C.

    Labourer

    16

    Elizabeth Gilbert

    P.

    2

    8

    £16

    15

    Names Town now in Removed from No. of Childn Relig. Profess. Occupation Sums

    Brot forward

    £16

    15

    Mary Dodd W.

    Marblehead

    1

    P.

    12

    Mary High & a Widow Daughter

    2

    P.

    1

    Elizabeth Trevy W.

    P.

    2

    8

    Sarah Curtice W.

    4

    P.

    16

    Mary Russell W.

    5

    P.

    18

    Sarah Flint W.

    2

    P.

    12

    Mary Andrews

    P.

    6

    Mary Poor W.

    4

    P.

    16

    Sarah Masury W.

    C.

    8

    Elizabeth Magery W.

    2

    C.

    12

    Mary Dennis W.

    1

    C.

    6

    Hannah Allen W.

    1

    P.

    8

    Thomas Tucker & Wife

    1

    C.

    Fisherman

    12

    William Goss & Wife

    1

    P.

    Fisherman

    8

    Margret Gillam W.

    P.

    10

    Ephraim Ashton & Wife

    P.

    Fisherman

    12

    Mary Laskey W.

    P.

    8

    Rebekah Conditt (Husbd absent)

    P.

    6

    Thomas Molley & Wife

    3

    P.

    Weaver

    11

    Mary Jones W.

    1

    C.

    12

    Samuel Farewell & Wife

    C.

    Fisherman

    5

    Elizabeth Burrill (Husbd absent)

    1

    C.

    5

    Hannah Dolten W.

    C.

    5

    Benjamin Walper

    1

    P.

    Ropemaker

    10

    4

    Jane Bridge W. & 2 Widow Daughters

    3

    C.

    18

    John Whittemore & Wife

    7

    P.

    Fisherman

    15

    Amey Gurler, Maiden

    C.

    8

    John Andrews & Wife

    C.

    Fisherman

    8

    Johanna Shaddock W.

    3

    P.

    12

    Rachel Quill W.

    2

    C.

    14

    Charity Vickery W.

    2

    P.

    6

    Elizabeth Turner W.

    1

    P.

    8

    Johanna Gurler W.

    6

    C.

    16

    Abigail Wormsted W.

    P.

    6

    Sarah Trevy W.

    1

    P.

    6

    Abigail Rayle W.

    1

    C.

    6

    Abigail Snelling (Husbd absent)

    3

    P.

    6

    Hannah Bird W.

    P.

    6

    Elizabeth Adams W.

    3

    P.

    16

    Samuel Loviss & Wife

    1

    P.

    Fisherman

    16

    Elizabeth Perry W.

    P.

    12

    Mary Nutting W.

    P.

    3

    Rebekah Turner W.

    P.

    3

    4

    Abigail Forrest W.

    P.

    3

    Margret Uncles W.

    1

    P.

    3

    Richard Welch, Boy

    P.

    8

    £38

    8

    6

    Names Town now in Removed from No. of Childn. Relig. Profess. Occupation Sums

    Brot forward

    £38

    8

    6

    Abraham Staples & Wife

    Marblehead

    3

    P.

    Fisherman

    12

    Rebekah Adams W.

    2

    P.

    12

    Joanna Killey W.

    2

    P.

    8

    Rebekah Vincent

    1

    P.

    12

    4

    Ephraim Silsbey & Wife

    Lynn

    Boston

    F.

    Shipwright

    1

    8

    Sarah Silsbev

    Salem

    F.

    12

    Hugh Alley & Wife

    Lynn

    5

    F.

    Fisherman

    1

    Anna Hawks

    Marblehead

    1

    F.

    16

    Ezra Curtain & Wife

    Boston

    5

    F.

    Shoemaker

    10

    Mary Gale

    F.

    18

    Rebekah Alley W.

    1

    F.

    12

    James Lowden & Daughter

    Danvers

    F.

    Glazier

    To Several Poor Childn belonging to Marblehead

    6

    2

    Content Roundy W.

    Lynn

    Marblehead

    3

    C.

    8

    Joshua Hemmingway & Wife

    Boston

    3

    P.

    Fisherman

    10

    William Atkins & Wife

    P.

    Fisherman

    11

    Sarah Martin (Husbd absent)

    Marblehead

    2

    C.

    6

    Widow Lydia Stuard

    Salem

    1

    P.

    6

    Eliza Elson (Husbd absent)

    Danvers

    4

    C.

    12

    To 4 Poor men, Sailors

    16

    10

    Samuel Goodale & Wife

    Salem

    F.

    10

    Richard Ellidge & Wife

    Danvers

    Marblehead

    5

    P.

    Sailor

    9

    Hannah Ramsdell W.

    Lynn

    P.

    6

    Mary Burn (Husbd absent)

    Marblehead

    P.

    10

    Elizabeth Pitman W.

    4

    P.

    8

    Susanna Miles W.

    2

    C.

    10

    Deborah Foster W.

    P.

    8

    Mary Holbrook W.

    1

    P.

    6

    Mary Bracket W.

    2

    C.

    10

    Joanna Striker W.

    2

    P.

    8

    Peter Martin & Wife

    P.

    8

    Mary Carrage W.

    2

    P.

    6

    Sarah Lancies W.

    3

    P.

    15

    Mary Curtice W.

    2

    P.

    12

    Rebekah Bowden W.

    3

    P.

    13

    Elizabeth Gails W.

    P.

    6

    Mary Kelly W.

    3

    P.

    12

    John Wair & Wife

    Chelsea Point Shirley

    Boston

    3

    P.

    Town Crier

    1

    James Coffin & Wife

    P.

    Sailor

    18

    Elener French W.

    2

    P.

    1

    John French & Wife

    2

    P.

    1

    William Todd

    P.

    15

    John Lee

    P.

    6

    Mary bumner W.

    3

    P.

    1

    Sarah Duckenfield W.

    I

    P.

    10

    Sarah Preisted W.

    P.

    9

    John Richardson & Wife

    2

    P.

    Labourer

    15

    £66

    11

    10

    Names Town now in Removed from No. of Childn. Relig. Profess. Occupation Sums

    Brot forward

    £66

    11

    10

    Henry Harris

    Point Shirley

    Boston

    3

    P.

    Peddler

    1

    4

    James Orell Wife

    3

    P.

    Labourer

    1

    Mary Nutbe W.

    P.

    12

    Mary Down (Husbd absent)

    1

    C.

    18

    John Gendell & Wife

    3

    P.

    Tailor

    18

    Lewis Channel & Wife

    4

    P.

    Labourer

    1

    4

    Hannah Sail W.

    3

    P.

    1

    Sarah Whitcomb W.

    P.

    12

    John Hutten & Wife

    2

    P.

    Blockmaker

    1

    1

    Elizabeth Colder W.

    1

    18

    James Brown

    C.

    9

    Eliab Kingman (Orphan Child)

    12

    Two Orphan Children

    18

    Two Orphan Children

    12

    Moses Deshon & Wife

    1

    P.

    Writer

    18

    Mary Scott (Husbd absent)

    P.

    18

    Lawrence Colebert & Wife

    P.

    Labourer

    18

    John King & Wife

    6

    Charles Perrin, Negroe

    6

    Jacob Tuckerman Orphan Boy 12 yrs old

    9

    Rebekah Alley W.

    Lynn

    1

    F.

    9

    Mary Gale

    F.

    1

    4

    Content Roundy W.

    Marblehead

    3

    C.

    18

    Ezra Curtain & Wife

    Boston

    5

    F.

    Shoemaker

    18

    Joshua Hemmingway & Wife

    3

    P.

    18

    Hugh Alley & Wife

    5

    F.

    Fisherman

    1

    4

    Anna Hawks W.

    Marblehead

    1

    F.

    1

    4

    Ephraim Silsbe & Wife

    Boston

    2

    F.

    Shipwright

    2

    8

    Samuel Sprague & Wife

    Charlestown

    2

    P.

    Brazier

    1

    10

    William Grubb

    1

    4

    Deborah Warner W.

    Boston

    12

    152 Donations, 420 persons

    £93

    11

    2

    No. 4. Marblehead. 201 Donations and £9 1s 11d left with the Select Men of which abt 36 Families Contg abt 96 persons were not before Vissited & Included in List No. 1, 2 & 3

    Names Town now in Removed from No. of Childn. Relig. Profess. Occupation Sums

    Judith Mardick W.

    Marblehead

    P.

    £

    10

    Saml Hitchens & Wife

    P.

    10

    Mary Tucker W.

    1

    P.

    8

    Anna Jackson (Husbd absent)

    4

    C.

    Sailor

    15

    Mary Widger W.

    C.

    10

    Deborah Cross W.

    C.

    10

    Sarah Brown W.

    P.

    10

    Simson Bowden & Wife

    P.

    Shoreman

    12

    Sarah Martin W.

    P.

    10

    £4

    15

    Names Town now in Removed from No. of Childn. Relig. Profess. Occupation Sums

    £4

    15

    Mary Vickry W.

    Marblehead

    P.

    10

    Alice Burrows W.

    P.

    12

    Grace Cammel (Husbd absent)

    3

    P.

    18

    John Pierce & Wife

    P.

    Baker

    15

    Mary English W.

    P.

    6

    Mary Turner, Rebekah Bezum & Usina Creasey Ws.

    1

    1

    1

    E. Moss absent

    4

    P.

    Sailor

    15

    Elener Bartlet W.

    P.

    10

    Mary Rowls W.

    1

    C.

    15

    Mary Brockel W.

    1

    C.

    12

    Johanna Striker W.

    2

    P.

    12

    Mary Smith W.

    P.

    12

    Samuel Holman

    2

    P.

    Shoreman

    12

    Elizabeth Barker W.

    1

    P.

    12

    Elizabeth Pitman W.

    4

    P.

    15

    Mary Martin W.

    P.

    10

    Deborah Davis W.

    P.

    10

    Peter Martin & Wife

    P.

    Fisherman

    10

    Elizabeth Gale W.

    P.

    10

    Sarah Lancey W.

    3

    P.

    16

    Mary Curtice W.

    2

    P.

    15

    Ann Owens W.

    1

    P.

    15

    Mary Dennis W.

    C.

    15

    Margret Chapman (Husbd absent)

    4

    C.

    Sailor

    18

    Abigail Forester W.

    P.

    10

    Rebekah Vincent

    1

    P.

    12

    Sarah Lecraw W.

    P.

    6

    Eliza Stacey W.

    2

    P.

    12

    Rebekah Adams W.

    2

    P.

    12

    Johanna Kelley W.

    1

    P.

    10

    Sarah Hendley W.

    2

    C.

    15

    Amy Gurdler

    C.

    10

    Elizabeth Masury W.

    2

    C.

    12

    Sarah Masury W.

    C.

    8

    Elizabeth Rothwell (Husbd absent)

    1

    P.

    Sailor

    12

    Mary Dolton

    1

    P.

    8

    Elizabeth Atkin (Husbd absent)

    2

    C.

    Sailor

    12

    Dorcas Russell W.

    P.

    10

    Anna Abbot W.

    2

    P.

    12

    Elizabeth Bayley W.

    1

    P.

    12

    Susanna Hooper W.

    P.

    10

    Willm Robinson & Wife

    P.

    10

    Mary Hitchborn (Husbd absent)

    2

    P.

    12

    Rebekah Robinson W.

    3

    P.

    15

    Eliza Cross W.

    2

    P.

    15

    Elizabeth Gilbert W.

    P.

    9

    Mary Mase W.

    P.

    10

    £33

    4

    Names Town now in Removed from No. of Childn. Relig. Profess. Occupation Sums

    Brot torward

    £33

    4

    Ann Tefts W.

    Marblehead

    P.

    12

    Mary Hooper W.

    1

    P.

    12

    Mary Ingalls, Maiden

    P.

    10

    Mary Dodel W.

    1

    P.

    12

    Saml Loviss & Wife

    1

    P.

    12

    Hannah Brimblecomb W.

    P.

    15

    Hannah Biard W.

    P.

    10

    Hannah Bully W.

    1

    P.

    12

    Eliza Gowdy W.

    P.

    10

    Eliza Pousland W.

    2

    P.

    12

    Mary Treffry W.

    P.

    10

    Jane Strong W.

    5

    P.

    18

    Mary Meservy W.

    P.

    10

    Charity Pritchard W.

    1

    P.

    10

    Mary High W. & Widow Eliza her Daughtr

    3

    P.

    18

    Sarah Elkins W.

    P.

    10

    Eliza Perry W.

    P.

    12

    Charity Foot W.

    10

    Mary Russell W.

    5

    P.

    15

    Sarah Flint W.

    2

    P.

    12

    Mary Andros W & an antiente Mother W.

    P.

    12

    Mary Nuting W.

    P.

    12

    Rebekah Torner W.

    P.

    12

    Deliverance Hindly W.

    P.

    15

    Mary Dixy W.

    P.

    12

    Mary Grant W.

    1

    P.

    10

    William Peters & Wife

    P.

    18

    Joseph Snellings & Wife

    3

    P.

    12

    Hepzibeh Virge W.

    P.

    12

    Hannah Dennis W.

    P.

    12

    Joseph Doliber & Wife

    P.

    Labourer

    15

    Eliza Ellit W.

    1

    P.

    15

    John Grant and Wife

    P.

    15

    Nicholas Gale

    P.

    Fisherman

    12

    Prissila Jacobs W.

    1

    P.

    15

    Elizabeth Nuting W.

    2

    P.

    15

    Margret Lecrow W.

    1

    P.

    15

    Alice Dimond W.

    P.

    12

    Nathanl Stacey & Wife

    5

    P.

    1

    4

    Hannah Salter W.

    P.

    15

    Anna Morgan W. & Mother W.

    1

    P.

    15

    Susanna Ashton W.

    2

    P.

    15

    Ann Furgison W.

    2

    P.

    15

    Mareb Glover W.

    P.

    10

    Sarah Loviss W.

    P.

    15

    Sarah Ritchead (Husbd absent)

    3

    C.

    10

    Abigail Call W.

    2

    C.

    15

    Mary Reed W.

    2

    C.

    15

    £64

    16

    Names Town now in Removed from No. of Childn. Relig. Profess. Occupation Sums

    Brot forward

    £64

    16

    Mary Blaney W.

    Marblehead

    3

    P.

    15

    Mary Ashton W.

    C.

    10

    Esther Gabriel W.

    1

    C.

    15

    John Pain (a Child 6 yrs old)

    6

    Mary Pierce W.

    1

    P.

    12

    Rebekah Kinsman W.

    P.

    9

    Sarah Neal W.

    2

    P.

    15

    Meriam Fryer W.

    1

    P.

    12

    Lydia Reed W.

    P.

    12

    Rebekah Cavendish (Husbd absent)

    3

    P.

    12

    John Pedrick & Wife

    P.

    12

    Anna Rose

    3

    P.

    15

    Mary Laske W.

    P.

    12

    Hannah Copp (Husbd absent)

    P.

    12

    Elizabeth Ramsdell W.

    C.

    10

    Jane Girler W.

    P.

    12

    Mary Kenterbery W.

    1

    C.

    12

    Lois Mumford W.

    1

    C.

    12

    Mary Criste (Husbd absent)

    1

    C.

    12

    Bethiah Waters W.

    C.

    12

    Meriam Lapthorn W.

    P.

    15

    Elizabeth Adams W.

    3

    P.

    18

    Sarah Brown W.

    C.

    10

    Martha Gassear W.

    6

    C.

    1

    Sarah Taylor W.

    1

    C.

    6

    Ann Rush W.

    1

    C.

    12

    Mary Furne (Husbd cast away)

    1

    C.

    12

    John Whitam & Wife

    3

    C.

    Fisherman

    15

    Abigail Dennis W.

    P.

    10

    Sarah Humphres W.

    3

    P.

    12

    Joanna Shaddock W.

    3

    P.

    15

    Lydia Hunskam W.

    P.

    9

    Mary Anderson (Husbd absent)

    1

    P.

    15

    Eliza Cramberse (Husbd absent)

    3

    C.

    12

    Rachel Quill W.

    2

    C.

    12

    Charity Vickery W.

    1

    P.

    6

    Hannah Girler W.

    6

    C.

    1

    Abigail Wormsted W.

    3

    C.

    18

    Bridget Lopthorn W. 93 yrs old142

    1

    P.

    18

    Thomas Tucker & Wife

    1

    C.

    Fisherman

    12

    Wm Gose & Wife

    1

    C.

    Fisherman

    8

    Hannah Allen W.

    1

    C.

    7

    Ephraim Ashton & Wife

    P.

    Fisherman

    15

    Elizabeth Thorne W.

    8

    Mary Jones W.

    1

    P.

    18

    Jane Poor W.

    2

    C.

    10

    Ann Funda W.

    3

    P.

    12

    Mary White W.

    P.

    7

    Elizabeth Davis W.

    C.

    10

    £94

    17

    Names Town now in Removed from No. of Childn. Relig. Profess Occupation Sums

    Brot forward

    £94

    17

    Sarah Mojey W.

    Marblehead

    1

    P.

    10

    Hannah Curtice W.

    2

    P.

    12

    Rebekah Clark W.

    4

    P.

    18

    Elizabeth Florence W.

    5

    P.

    1

    Grace Meeder W.

    2

    P.

    10

    Richard Hood & Wife

    7

    P.

    18

    Lydia Robinson (Husbd absent)

    3

    C.

    12

    Deborah Foster W.

    P.

    6

    Jane Bridge W. & 2 Widow Daughters

    2

    C.

    18

    Mary Holbrook W.

    1

    P.

    9

    Jane Merrit W.

    1

    P.

    10

    Rebekah Johnson W.

    P.

    12

    Nicholas Girler & Wife

    1

    C.

    15

    Susanna Lewis W.

    1

    P.

    8

    Ann Grow W.

    1

    P.

    12

    Abraham Staples & Wife

    3

    P.

    1

    Bulah Brock & 2 Widow Sisters

    P.

    1

    Thomas King & Wife

    5

    P.

    Husbandman

    1

    Susanna Miles W.

    3

    C.

    12

    Ann Coleman (Husbd absent)

    3

    C.

    18

    Elizabeth Diamond W.

    1

    P.

    8

    Thomas Mollet & Wife

    3

    P.

    Tallow Chandler

    15

    Mary & Eliza Queker, two Orphans

    12

    Susanna Dennis W.

    2

    C.

    15

    Elizabeth Swan W.

    1

    P.

    6

    Elias Briars & Wife

    C.

    18

    Elizabeth Burrill

    1

    C.

    6

    Deborah Codner W.

    1

    C.

    12

    Elizabeth Dodd W.

    5

    P.

    1

    4

    Jane Chapman W.

    1

    P.

    10

    Lydia Main W.

    1

    P.

    10

    Mary Brown

    P.

    8

    Mary Lode W.

    C.

    9

    Marv Bassetr W.

    P.

    9

    Elizabeth Gray W.

    P.

    8

    Hannah Dolton W.

    5

    C.

    18

    Elizabeth Wallis W.

    2

    P.

    12

    Mary Hagatha (Husbd absent)

    5

    P.

    1

    Anna Stacy W.

    P.

    10

    Mary Sammon W.

    P.

    10

    Emm Clark W.

    1

    C.

    9

    Elizabeth Garreson W.

    2

    C.

    12

    Mary Girdler W.

    C.

    12

    Mary Hickey W.

    P.

    9

    Abigail Thompson W.

    6

    P.

    1

    4

    Mary Girrel W.

    1

    P.

    15

    Mary Flack

    P.

    10

    Sarah Bevrage W.

    P.

    6

    201 Donations

    £125

    14

    Brot forward

    £125

    14

    Left in the Hands of the Select Men of Marblehead for some people omitted, to be distributed in like manner and an acct to be renderd

    9

    1

    11

    The above were Visited by Jeremiah Hacker & Samuel Collins, in Company with the Select Men £72 pd by S. Collins & £62 15 11 by Jere. Hacker

    £134

    15

    11

    No. 5. Salem and Danvers

    288 Donations the families containing

    799 persons

    of whom about 250 D[onations] Contg

    690 persons

    were vissited before 38 New [Donations]

    109 [persons]

    Names Town now in Removed from No. of Childn. Relig. Profess Occupation Sums

    1776

    John Daland & Wife

    Salem

    5

    P.

    Butcher

    £1

    10

    Rebekah Moolet (Husbd absent)

    Marblehead

    3

    P.

    Husband Sailor

    15

    Sarar Oliver W.

    P.

    12

    James Whittemore & Wife

    F.

    Labourer

    10

    Samuel Masury & Wife

    P.

    Mariner

    16

    Thomas Meek & Wife

    6

    P.

    Fisherman

    1

    10

    Lydia Hood W.

    Lynn

    Charlestown

    P.

    1

    Richard Hood & Wife

    3

    F.

    Coaster

    12

    Saml Nicholls’ Wife (himself taken on Bord a Man of War)

    Salem

    5

    P.

    Mariner

    1

    4

    To Sundry Poor Children of

    Marblehead

    2

    Lydia Galley W.

    Salem

    Boston

    2

    P.

    1

    4

    Eunice Veil (single Woman)

    P.

    10

    William Burk & Wife (himself absent) “

    2

    P.

    Sailor

    12

    John Masury

    2

    P.

    Sailor

    12

    Lydia Palfrey W.

    1

    P.

    18

    Mary Wellman W.

    3

    P.

    6

    Rebekah Turner W. (a Negroe)

    P.

    6

    Benjamin Masury & Wife

    1

    P.

    Barber

    10

    Daniel Shehen & Wife (himself absent)

    3

    P.

    12

    Susanna Hamblen W.

    Boston

    2

    C.

    18

    Ann Goodhue W.

    C.

    12

    Gidney King & Wife

    3

    P.

    Joiner

    18

    Robert Hooper & Mother

    C.

    Labourer

    6

    Sarah Lemmon W.

    C.

    12

    Cornelius Mathews & Wife (himself taken)

    3

    C.

    Sailor

    18

    Hannah Sluman W.

    3

    P.

    12

    John Crowningshield & Wife

    5

    C.

    Carpenter

    18

    Susanna Beadle W.

    5

    P.

    18

    Jane Flint W. & a Maiden Sister

    P.

    10

    Joshua Trask & Wife & Mother

    2

    C.

    Sailor

    1

    4

    Mary Mires W.

    2

    P.

    18

    Joseph Smith & Wife

    P.

    Fisherman

    18

    Abigail Punchard

    P.

    10

    £24

    13

    Names Town now in Removed from No. of Childn. Relig. Profess. Occupation Sums

    Brot forward

    £24

    13

    Elizabeth Giles W.

    Salem

    P.

    12

    Jemima Porter W.

    P.

    12

    Abigail Cash W.

    P.

    6

    Rebekah Pattison W.

    C.

    12

    Sarah Gerald W.

    P.

    12

    To John Collos of Plymouth, Peter Larche of Portsmouth, Joseph Temple of Greenwich, Old Engd143

    1

    Left with the Goal Keeper to add to their allowance a Qt of Coffee & a bisket a day

    14

    Elizabeth Yell W. and her Daughter Eliza Foster W.

    Salem

    2

    P.

    1

    4

    Elizabeth Bell W.

    2

    P.

    13

    Ruth Hacker, single Woman

    1

    P.

    10

    Hannah Abbot W.

    1

    P.

    11

    Francis Nicholson & Wife (himself abst)

    3

    C.

    Sailor

    10

    Thomas Johnson & Wife & their Daughter (her Husbd absent)

    Boston

    2

    P.

    Cabinetmaker

    1

    4

    Susanna Masury W.

    2

    C.

    12

    Ruth Getchel W.

    1

    P.

    6

    Samuel McIntire & Wife

    6

    P.

    Carpenter

    15

    Jemima Hurlbut W.

    P.

    8

    Hannah Punchard W.

    P.

    10

    Jane Seaver W.

    Boston

    P.

    12

    Lydia McMarrow W.

    2

    P.

    14

    Abigail Powell (Husbd absent)

    2

    P.

    10

    Mary Glover W.

    1

    P.

    12

    Willm Hacker & 2 Daughters

    1

    P.

    18

    Mary Burchmore W. & her Daughter Hannah W.

    P.

    16

    Elizabeth McIntire W.

    4

    P.

    18

    Lydia Alexander W.

    2

    P.

    12

    Hannah Manning W.

    P.

    6

    Sarah Edey (Husband absent)

    1

    P.

    11

    Bethiah Trask W.

    3

    P.

    10

    Mary Lander W.

    P.

    12

    Richard Lander & Wife

    6

    P.

    18

    Mary Mecham W.

    P.

    12

    Sarah Briggs W.

    1

    C.

    12

    Jane Doyle W.

    3

    C.

    18

    Mary Leavit W.

    2

    P.

    15

    William Lofty & Wife & Widow Mother

    C.

    Sailor

    15

    Hannah Robinson W.

    C.

    10

    Eunice Robinson W.

    4

    C.

    12

    Mary Chamberlain W.

    Charlestown

    2

    P.

    18

    Rebekah White W.

    1

    P.

    12

    Mary Austin W.

    Charlestown

    P.

    1

    Elizabeth Bullock W.

    1

    P.

    10

    John Archer & Wife

    1

    P.

    12

    £52

    19

    Names Town now in Removed from No. of Childn. Relig. Profess. Occupation Sums

    Brot forward

    £52

    19

    Sarah & Bethiah Archer, Maidens

    Salem

    P.

    12

    Rebekah Sutton W.

    P.

    6

    Abigail Edey W

    Charlestown

    P.

    12

    Elizabeth Williams W.

    1

    P.

    12

    Joseph Brown & Wife

    2

    P.

    Sailor

    12

    Mary Rich (Husbd absent)

    3

    P.

    Husband Sailor

    12

    Hannah Clemens W.

    4

    P.

    12

    Hannah Farrand W.

    Boston

    1

    P.

    12

    Susanna Sanders W.

    1

    P.

    18

    Hannah Fraizer W.

    3

    P.

    18

    2

    Rachel Ervin W.

    P.

    15

    Rachel Fuller (Husbd absent)

    3

    P.

    15

    Lydia Killey W.

    1

    P.

    12

    Elizabeth Morgan W.

    1

    P.

    12

    Nathaniel Perkins & Wife

    1

    P.

    Labourer

    12

    Ruth Tarrant W.

    1

    P.

    12

    Mary Marston W.

    1

    P.

    12

    Alice Ballard W.

    4

    P.

    15

    Sarah Sims W.

    P.

    6

    Simon Lamb & Wife

    4

    P.

    15

    Hannah Muchford W.

    6

    P.

    12

    Joseph Peel & Wife

    3

    P.

    12

    Elizabeth Procter W.

    Boston

    P.

    6

    John Riche & Wife

    2

    P.

    Sailor

    12

    Richard Shelton & Wife

    7

    P.

    Tidesman

    18

    John Sluman & Wife

    P.

    16

    Thomas Sluman & Wife

    1

    P.

    Sailor

    12

    Edmund Munyon & Wife

    7

    P.

    Labourer

    12

    Peter Henfield & Wife

    P.

    Labourer

    6

    Sarah Pease W. & Mother

    1

    P.

    15

    John Sluman Junr & Wife

    1

    P.

    Sailor

    15

    Rebekah Oakman W.

    P.

    8

    John Tink & Wife

    1

    P.

    Caulker

    12

    Hannah Lecrow (Husbd absent)

    1

    P.

    15

    James Chapman & Wife

    P.

    Labourer

    6

    Thomas Horton & Wife

    1

    P.

    Labourer

    10

    Lydia Osborne W.

    3

    P.

    15

    Mary Young W.

    C.

    6

    Mary Kelley W.

    1

    P.

    14

    Thomas Heather & Wife

    2

    C.

    15

    Robert Cook & Wife

    1

    P.

    12

    Jonathan Whitefoot

    P.

    10

    Mary Frye W.

    P.

    12

    Mary Bowdwich (Husbd absent)

    6

    P.

    1

    4

    Susanna Phippin W.

    P.

    10

    Lydia Stillman W.

    P.

    12

    Samuel Gavet & Wife

    2

    P.

    12

    Mary Lister W.

    1

    P.

    8

    Margret Clerk

    3

    P.

    18

    John Brown & Wife

    1

    P.

    16

    Lydia Cook W.

    P.

    12

    £84

    14

    2

    Names Town now in Removed from No. of Childn. Relig. Profess. Occupation Sums

    Brot forward

    £84

    14

    2

    Mary Brown W.

    Salem

    P.

    10

    Desire White W.

    P.

    10

    Sarah Tozer W.

    1

    P.

    12

    Elizabeth Millit W.

    3

    P.

    18

    Mary Whitefoot W.

    P.

    8

    Abial Tozer W.

    3

    P.

    12

    Abigail Wiley (Husbd absent)

    3

    P.

    Husband Sailor

    15

    Ruth Squires (Husbd absent)

    1

    P.

    Husband Sailor

    12

    Ruth White (Husbd absent)

    2

    P.

    Husband Sailor

    12

    Ann Clough W.

    P.

    12

    Margret Swasey W.

    1

    P.

    12

    Sarah Silver (Husbd absent)

    5

    P.

    Husband Sailor

    18

    Mary Wardels W.

    P.

    8

    Margret Curtice W.

    P.

    8

    Lydia Walper W.

    2

    P.

    12

    Hannah Wells W.

    3

    P.

    18

    Abigail Curtice W.

    1

    P.

    12

    Rachel Cane W.

    2

    P.

    16

    James Chever & Wife

    4

    P.

    18

    Mary Megraw W.

    1

    P.

    12

    Ruth Searls W.

    P.

    10

    Sarah Brimblecomb (Husbd absent)

    3

    P.

    Sailor

    16

    Mary Cox W.

    1

    1

    P.

    9

    Abigail Laskin, Maiden

    1

    P.

    5

    Mary Cox W.

    P.

    9

    Hannah Cox W.

    2

    P.

    9

    John Walper & Wife

    3

    P.

    Sailor

    18

    James Collins & Wife

    P.

    Carpenter

    10

    Mary Cloutman W.

    1

    P.

    6

    Joseph Searls & Wife

    P.

    10

    Mercy Beadle W.

    P.

    12

    Lydia Authur (Husbd absent)

    2

    P.

    12

    Susanna Knight W.

    P.

    11

    John Batten & Wife

    3

    P.

    Sailor

    11

    John Foot

    P.

    Labourer

    12

    Isaac Williams & Wife

    Marblehead

    5

    Shoreman

    18

    Christian Fransworth & Wife

    Boston

    2

    C.

    18

    Elizabeth Philpot, Maiden & her Aunt

    P.

    12

    Hannah Murry & Mother a Widow

    1

    P.

    15

    Abigail Masury W.

    1

    P.

    12

    John Ingersol & Wife

    5

    P.

    18

    Clifford Burns & Wife (himself absent)

    2

    P.

    12

    Elizabeth Whitefoot W.

    P.

    5

    Martha Renew W.

    3

    P.

    15

    Hannah Mansfield W.

    1

    P.

    12

    Sarah Cash & Widow Littlefield

    P.

    12

    John Brown & Wife

    2

    P.

    15

    £113

    13

    2

    Names Town now in Removed from No. of Childn. Relig. Profess. Occupation Sums

    Brot forward

    £113

    13

    2

    Thomas Tolbert & Wife (himself absent)

    Salem

    1

    P.

    12

    To John Whitford for a poor Child

    1

    8

    Lydia Miller W.

    1

    8

    Mary Cloutman W.

    P.

    10

    Ebenezer Whitefoot & Wife (himself absent)

    P.

    9

    8

    John Bean & Wife (himself absent)

    P.

    10

    Robert Allen & Wife

    1

    P.

    12

    Elizabeth Hibbert W.

    3

    P.

    15

    Joseph McIntire & Wife

    5

    P.

    Carpenter

    18

    Joseph Gilford & Wife

    5

    C.

    Labourer

    18

    Thomas Needham & Wife

    5

    P.

    Joiner

    12

    Mary Gottear W.

    1

    P.

    10

    Bethiah Ruck W.

    2

    P.

    12

    Hephzibeh Ruck W.

    3

    P.

    15

    Mary Felt W.

    P.

    12

    Susanna Townsend W. & Widow Couch

    3

    P.

    18

    Joseph Roberts & Wife

    P.

    Sailor

    12

    Abigail Still W. & Mother

    1

    P.

    12

    Mercy Giles W.

    1

    P.

    11

    Mary Hubbart W.

    2

    P.

    12

    John Foster & Wife

    2

    P.

    12

    Mary Hathorne W.

    5

    P.

    18

    Mary Osborn

    2

    P.

    9

    Mary Hinman

    C.

    8

    Joshua Pearce & Wife

    Boston

    1

    P.

    Boatbuilder

    12

    Mary Pearce, Maiden

    P.

    6

    Margret Crispin W.

    3

    P.

    12

    Love Herrin W.

    1

    P.

    12

    John Leach Junr & Wife

    2

    P.

    Carpenter

    15

    John Leach

    P.

    Carpenter

    10

    Elizabeth Leach (single)

    P.

    8

    Walter Richards & Wife

    5

    P.

    18

    Mary Gould W.

    P.

    6

    Eunice Coffin W.

    P.

    6

    George Thomas & Wife

    3

    P.

    18

    Lydia McIntire & Sarah Tarrant Ws.

    P.

    12

    Elizabeth Pease W. & Daughter

    P.

    12

    Elizabeth Very (Husbd absent)

    1

    P.

    6

    Damaris Dowst W.

    1

    P.

    10

    Joseph Pitman & Wife

    3

    P.

    18

    Jacob Barret & Wife

    P.

    Labourer

    12

    Mary Langsfood, Maiden, & Sister Hannah

    P.

    12

    Mary Searls (Husbd absent)

    2

    P.

    12

    Sarah Tarrant W.

    1

    P.

    9

    £139

    12

    10

    Names Town now in Removed from No. of Childn. Relig. Profess. Occupation Sums

    Brot forward

    £139

    12

    10

    Nathaniel Holden & Wife

    Salem

    5

    P.

    Labourer

    18

    Hannah Wallis W.

    1

    P.

    10

    Eliza Kempton W.

    P.

    12

    Elizabeth Marsh W.

    P.

    6

    Mary Wellman W.

    6

    P.

    1

    4

    Sarah Felt W.

    P.

    12

    John Bullock & Wife

    7

    P.

    Fisherman

    1

    10

    William Reeves

    1

    P.

    Heelmaker

    12

    Rebekah Sterns W.

    P.

    10

    Elizabeth Drisdill W.

    1

    P.

    12

    Margret Meloy W. (Husbd killed at Cape Ann)

    5

    P.

    1

    4

    Margret Pitman W. & Mother

    2

    P.

    12

    Eunice Stuard W.

    P.

    8

    Mary Lambert W.

    1

    P.

    12

    Mary Grant W.

    P.

    6

    Lydia Stuard W.

    P.

    12

    9

    Jacob Hendly & Wife

    Boston

    2

    P.

    Blacksmith

    18

    Jonathan Southwick & Wife

    4

    P.

    Fisherman

    18

    James Phillips & Wife

    Danvers

    C.

    Rigger

    18

    Mary Trask W. & Mother

    Salem

    2

    P.

    15

    Eunice Burns W.

    1

    P.

    10

    3

    Catherine Geminy W.

    2

    P.

    12

    Jemima Teuksbery W.

    3

    P.

    18

    Enoch Goodale & Wife

    5

    F.

    Potter

    1

    4

    Susanna Rix W. & her Sister a W.

    P.

    15

    Benjamin Peters & Wife

    7

    P.

    Joiner

    15

    Betty McIntire W.

    1

    P.

    Mariner

    12

    Timothy Jarvis & Wife

    2

    P.

    1

    4

    Samuel Rowls & Wife

    Danvers

    Marblehead

    5

    C.

    Sailor

    18

    James Lowden & Daughter

    Boston

    F.

    1

    4

    Susanna Tropheter W.

    Salem

    2

    P.

    12

    Richard Teuksbery & Wife

    3

    P.

    Currier

    12

    Alice Whittemore W.

    1

    P.

    10

    Sarah Merrit W.

    1

    P.

    6

    Daniel Cloutman & Wife

    1

    P.

    8

    John Bickford & Wife

    6

    P.

    Fisherman

    1

    4

    Martha Boyd W.

    3

    P.

    18

    Sarah Adams W.

    P.

    18

    Mehetable McIntire W.

    P.

    6

    Ann Goodale W.

    F.

    6

    Elizabeth Ellison (Husband absent)

    Danvers

    4

    P.

    15

    Elener Breson (very poor)

    Salem

    C.

    15

    Rhode Giles (Husbd absent at Sea)

    5

    P.

    18

    2

    Sarah Hunstable (Husbd absent)

    P.

    18

    Miriam Minto (free Negroe)

    12

    Nance Midleton (a free Negroe)

    12

    Mary Ruby W.

    P.

    18

    £174

    3

    Names Town now in Removed from No. of Childn. Relig. Profess. Occupation Sums

    Brot forward

    £174

    3

    Mary Parker, Maiden

    Salem

    Boston

    P.

    12

    Mary Hopping W.

    Newbury

    Charlestown

    1

    P.

    18

    Mary Jackson W.

    Salem

    Boston

    P.

    12

    John Top & Wife

    P.

    6

    E. Eden W.

    2

    P.

    12

    Mary Gale W.

    2

    P.

    8

    Nathanl Ropes & Wife

    1

    P.

    Cooper

    12

    Hannah Emmerson W.

    2

    P.

    15

    Ruth Hines W.

    5

    P.

    18

    Hittey Commings (Husbd absent)

    1

    P.

    12

    Margret Tyler W.

    2

    P.

    15

    William Holman & Wife

    5

    P.

    18

    Betty Nurse W.

    Danvers

    2

    P.

    15

    John Peese & Wife

    2

    P.

    15

    Elizabeth Leach W.

    Salem

    2

    P.

    12

    Thomas Grant & Wife

    Danvers

    Marblehead

    6

    P.

    Fisherman

    1

    10

    Susanna Reeves W.

    Salem

    1

    P.

    12

    Phebe Tink W.

    5

    P.

    18

    Susanna Bickford, Maiden

    Boston

    C.

    7

    6

    Jonathan Tarrant & Wife

    Reading

    Salem

    4

    P.

    Sailor

    18

    To Deborah Burrill, — Davies & several others poor in Meal &c.

    Marblehead

    9

    6

    John Brown

    Salem

    Boston

    C.

    Boatman

    2

    Eunice Tucker W. Danvers

    Danvers

    1

    P.

    Weaver

    12

    £189

    12

    The within Visited & Relieved out of Friends’

    Charity, By Jeremiah Hacker, Josiah Southwick

    & Samuel Purintun accompanied by Capt Richard Derby

    & Capt Jonathan Gardner Junr part of the time.

    No. 6. Places East of Cape Ann to Falmouth. 3d Mo 1776, 139 Donations & £70 left to be Distributed & Accounted for, the Families containing 539 persons

    Names Town now in Removed from No. of Childn. Relig. Profess. Occupation Sums

    Aaron Honskons & Wife

    Lee, N. H.

    5

    P.

    Labourer

    £

    17

    Mary Rand W.

    P.

    12

    Eliza Whood W. & Sarah Fox single Woman, poor

    Greenland

    P.

    12

    Ebenezer Warters & Wife

    Dover

    Boston

    3

    P.

    Joiner

    1

    4

    Abigail Calf W.

    P.

    12

    Ebenezer Ransom & Wife

    2

    P.

    Labourer

    12

    Thomas Barns & Wife

    Durham

    Great Island

    5

    P.

    Fisherman

    18

    Johanna Lerry W.

    Dover

    4

    P.

    1

    2

    William Gillparatick, Junr & Wife (himself taken)

    Biddeford

    4

    P.

    1

    10

    Andrew Yaten & Wife

    Dover

    3

    P.

    Sailor

    18

    Mary Kenny W.

    4

    P.

    1

    £9

    17

    Names Town now in Removed from No. of Childn. Relig. Profess. Occupation Sums

    Brot forward

    £9

    17

    Abigail Smith (Husbd absent) & Mother a W.

    Dover

    Portsmouth

    4

    P.

    1

    2

    Moses Sawyer & Wife

    3

    P.

    18

    Palatiah Furnall & Wife

    Falmouth

    5

    C.

    Blockmaker

    1

    4

    Elizabeth Spinnel W.

    2

    18

    Thomas Crisp & Wife

    1

    C.

    12

    William Brown & Wife

    4

    P.

    Carpenter

    12

    Josiah Tucker & Wife

    6

    P.

    Sailmaker

    1

    10

    Esther Stickney W. & her Mother a W.

    3

    P.

    1

    10

    John Johnson

    C.

    12

    Hagar West, a Negro Woman

    6

    Sarah Cox W.

    5

    P.

    1

    10

    John Bradbery & Wife

    1

    C.

    Barber

    1

    4

    Bethiah Rollins (Husbd absent)

    3

    P.

    12

    James Wildridge & Wife

    6

    P.

    Sailor

    1

    10

    John Wood & Wife

    C.

    12

    Sarah Jackson (Husbd absent)

    Boston

    P.

    18

    Sarah Prat W.

    C.

    18

    Henry Whales & Wife

    3

    P.

    1

    4

    Joseph Roberts & Wife

    4

    C.

    Caulker

    1

    10

    Ann Cotes W. & Mary Coney W.

    1

    P.

    18

    Mary Sherman (Husbd absent)

    1

    F.

    18

    Elizabeth Wommagom W.

    3

    P.

    1

    10

    Margret Dew W.

    1

    P.

    18

    Mary Cunningham W.

    2

    C.

    18

    Dominecas Cavon & Wife

    C.

    18

    John Knight & Wife

    5

    P.

    Carpenter

    1

    16

    John Baker & Wife

    3

    C.

    Caulker

    1

    4

    Anna Moses W.

    P.

    12

    Mary Corser (a Maiden)

    P.

    12

    Peter Merril & Wife

    3

    C.

    18

    William Freeman

    Broadbay

    P.

    6

    Susanna Sweet W.

    Scarborough

    3

    P.

    18

    John Brooks & Wife

    Falmouth

    6

    P.

    Caulker

    1

    16

    Mary Westerman W.

    1

    P.

    15

    Thomas Cook & Wife

    4

    P.

    Glazier

    1

    4

    Elizabeth Stephens W.

    3

    P.

    1

    10

    Mary Tuckfield W.

    1

    P.

    18

    Mary Cox W.

    Georgetown

    2

    P.

    18

    William Wissell & Wife

    Georgetown

    Falmouth

    5

    C.

    Carpenter

    1

    4

    Lucy, Nancy & Hannah Oatten, Maiden

    Falmouth

    1

    16

    Benjamin Bagly & Wife

    2

    P.

    Mason

    1

    John Leatherby & Wife

    3

    P.

    Labourer

    18

    Sarah Cromwell W. & her Daughter Mary Chadwit W.

    18

    1

    P.

    18

    Edmund Dossett & Wife

    1

    C.

    1

    4

    Rebekah Burdick

    Boston

    P.

    1

    4

    Margret Merry (Husbd absent)

    Biddeford

    1

    P.

    12

    Elijah Jenkins & Wife

    Berwick

    6

    F.

    1

    16

    £60

    6

    Names Town now in Removed from No. of Childn. Relig. Profess. Occupation Sums

    Brot forward

    £60

    6

    Joseph Storer & Wife

    Falmouth

    5

    P.

    Joiner

    18

    Jonathan Lambert & Wife

    3

    P.

    Barber

    1

    Peleg Willard & Wife

    3

    B.

    Tanner

    12

    Benjamin Poland & Wife

    1

    P.

    Sailor

    1

    4

    Hannah Poland & Wife [sic]

    P.

    12

    James Swain

    3

    C.

    Tailor

    1

    4

    Lucy Preston (Husbd absent)

    Cape Eliza

    2

    P.

    18

    William Davis & Wife

    Falmouth

    5

    P.

    1

    8

    Anna Mariner (Husbd absent)

    1

    P.

    12

    Whitford Mayo & Wife

    3

    P.

    1

    4

    Hannah Parker W.

    P.

    7

    6

    David Strout & Wife

    6

    P.

    1

    4

    Ruth Horton W.

    3

    P.

    1

    4

    Joseph Stanford & Wife

    5

    P.

    1

    8

    Jeremiah Sawyer & Wife

    6

    P.

    1

    16

    Humphrey Richards & Wife

    5

    P.

    1

    4

    Mary Woodbery W.

    P.

    10

    6

    David Alden & Wife

    8

    P.

    Labourer

    1

    16

    Samuel Cash & Wife

    3

    P.

    Labourer

    1

    4

    Elizabeth Cash (Husbd absent)

    2

    P.

    1

    4

    John Stimson & Wife

    6

    P.

    1

    4

    John Strout & Wife

    P.

    12

    Bathsheba Strout W.

    2

    P.

    12

    Catherine Roberts W.

    P.

    9

    Jonathan Webb & Wife

    1

    P.

    Schoolmaser

    15

    Robert Mayo & Wife

    P.

    18

    Rowland Gushing & Wife

    6

    P.

    1

    10

    Deborah Bayley W.

    P.

    12

    Lydia Lowell W.

    P.

    15

    Mary Cornish, Maiden

    Falmouth

    P.

    12

    Nathaniel Low & Wife

    Boston

    3

    F.

    Blacksmith

    1

    16

    Joshua Lawrence & Wife

    2

    C.

    Sailor

    1

    4

    Jonathan Morse & Wife

    P.

    Joiner

    15

    Abigail Crosby W.

    2

    C.

    12

    Cate Stone (Husbd absent)

    P.

    9

    9

    Mary Bradbery W.

    N. Yarmouth

    Falmouth

    P.

    12

    Mary Whitney W.

    Falmouth

    2

    P.

    18

    Manoah Pearson W.

    5

    P.

    1

    4

    Benjamin Rann & Wife

    5

    P.

    Baker

    18

    Charity Lunt W.

    P.

    10

    John Rann & Wife

    4

    P.

    Cabinetmaker

    1

    John Frink & Wife

    5

    P.

    Carpenter

    18

    Phebe Pope W.

    Boston

    F.

    18

    Elizabeth Weazie W.

    1

    P.

    1

    4

    Ebenezer Snow

    P.

    18

    Elizabeth Wire W.

    4

    C.

    1

    4

    Eliza Baker W.

    4

    P.

    18

    Rowland Bradbery & Wife

    18

    Simon Gougens & Wife

    1

    P.

    18

    Michael Newman & Wife

    C.

    1

    10

    Edmund Mumford & Wife

    5

    C.

    2

    8

    £111

    7

    9

    Names Town now in Removed from No. of Childn. Relig. Profess. Occupation Sums

    Brot forward

    £111

    7

    9

    Martha Millet, Maiden

    Falmouth

    P.

    12

    Joshua Henshaw & Wife

    5

    P.

    1

    4

    Anna Knight

    P.

    12

    Sarah Whitney

    1

    P.

    6

    Mary Cavens W.

    2

    P.

    12

    Jemima Harrison W.

    1

    P.

    1

    4

    Benjamin Pettingill & Wife

    3

    P.

    12

    Elizabeth Campbell W.

    3

    P.

    1

    4

    Sarah Procter (Husbd absent)

    3

    P.

    1

    4

    Samuel Lowell & Wife

    P.

    12

    David Hoyt & Wife

    P.

    1

    4

    Jane Bayley W.

    7

    P.

    1

    16

    Alice Rice W.

    P.

    12

    Ignatius Smith & Wife

    Cape Eliza

    P.

    Tailor

    12

    Peter Thomas & Wife

    5

    P.

    Sailmaker

    18

    Mary Scot W.

    Falmouth

    12

    John Damm & Wife

    Scarborough

    6

    P.

    Sailor

    18

    Henry Estes & Wife

    Berwick

    9

    F.

    Labourer

    1

    16

    Samuel Gould & Wife

    2

    F.

    (Infirm)

    18

    Ebenezer Hussey & Wife

    5

    F.

    Potter

    1

    16

    Tabitha Weighmouth & Neice

    Dover

    F.

    18

    Samuel Pinkham & Wife

    Newcastle

    3

    P.

    18

    Moses Verney & Wife

    6

    F.

    18

    Lydia Fowler W.

    Hampton

    F.

    12

    Abigail Fowler W.

    Newbury

    P.

    6

    Mary Fowler W.

    3

    P.

    1

    8

    Reuben Mace & Wife

    1

    P.

    Fisherman

    1

    4

    Rebekah Stocks (Husbd on bord a Man of War)

    2

    C.

    Husband Sailor

    1

    10

    William Mace & Wife

    1

    C.

    12

    £138

    17

    9

    Left in the Hands of Elijah Estes, Jonathan Damm & Solomon Hanson, for the Sufferers at Portsmouth, New Castle & Island of Shoals in New Hampshire of which an Acct is to be Renderd

    70

    £208

    17

    9

    The preceeding Names were Visited by Jeremiah Hacker, Elijah Estes, Jonathan Damm, Benja Winslow, Stephen Morrill & other Friends accompanied by the Select Men part of time. N.B. there were Corn, Hoggs Fatt & Pork purchas’d and sent on the Island.

    No. 7. Acct of 158 Donations, Distributed to the People (principaly) out of Boston & Charleston in 18 different Towns, the Families Containing 522 persons

    Date Names Town now in Removed from No of Childn. Relig. Profess. Occupation Sums

    1776

    1st Mo.

    2d

    Lydia Geer W.

    Providence

    Boston

    B.

    Seamstress

    £1

    4

    Mary Hawes, single Woman

    B.

    Tailoress

    10

    27

    Mary Barns (her husband in Boston)

    2

    P.

    1

    10

    £3

    4

    Date Names Town now in Removed from No. of Childn. Relig. Profess. Occupation Sums

    Brot forward

    £3

    4

    2d Mo.

    3d Day

    Josiah Gladings Wife

    Glastonbury

    Newport

    4

    P.

    Chaisemaker

    1

    10

    15

    Mildred Frothingham W.

    Providence

    Boston

    P.

    1

    4

    Susanah Hollioke W.

    P.

    1

    2

    29th

    Mary Checkley W.

    Killingly

    P.

    1

    10

    Susanah Adams & Sister, single Women

    Providence

    P.

    Seamstress

    2

    2d 3d Mo.

    Phillip Freeman Jun.

    Medfield

    5

    B.

    Trader

    2

    Love Gray W.

    B.

    1

    10

    — McClound & Wife

    B.

    Mariner

    1

    10

    Experience Ingerson W.

    1

    P.

    Schoolmistress

    1

    10

    Sarah Brown W.

    1

    B.

    1

    10

    Thankful Hawes, single & weakly

    B.

    1

    10

    Elizabeth Brown W.

    2

    P.

    1

    10

    John Wheeler, Wife

    2

    B.

    Mason

    1

    10

    Thomas Perkins, Wife

    Sherburn

    2

    P.

    1

    10

    Robert Brick, Wife

    4

    P.

    Cooper

    2

    Eliezer Dowse, Wife

    Holliston

    Charlestown

    5

    P.

    Leatherdresser

    2

    Widow Bruister aged 87

    Boston

    P.

    2

    Benja Pearce, Wife & aged Mother, crazy

    Framingham

    1

    P.

    Chairmaker

    2

    Edward Brazier, Wife

    5

    P.

    Mason

    2

    10

    3d

    Nathanael Brewer, Wife

    Bolton

    1

    P.

    Carpenter

    1

    8

    David Tones

    P.

    Sailmaker

    10

    Benia Edwards

    P.

    Tailor

    10

    Thomas Brewer, Wife

    4

    P.

    Glazier

    2

    10

    Avis Brewer W.

    P.

    Nurse

    1

    Avis Brewer Jun.

    P.

    Seamstress

    10

    Giles Brewer, Wife

    6

    C.

    Carpenter

    2

    10

    Giles Brewer & Wife near her Time

    C.

    Carpenter

    1

    10

    4th of 3d Mo.

    James Flood, lame Man

    P.

    Sailor

    1

    10

    John Richardson & Wife

    C.

    Labourer

    1

    Marcy Carder, W. sick, her things burnt in Charleston as she came out

    P.

    Nurse

    2

    Unice Kilcup (her husband decd since she came out)

    Lancaster

    1

    P.

    1

    15

    John Newman, Wife

    Charlestown

    6

    C.

    Clockmaker

    2

    10

    Sarah Serjeant, single Woman

    Boston

    P.

    Seamstress

    1

    John Swetser & Wife, aged People

    P.

    Tallow Chandler

    1

    10

    Jacob Swetser, Wife

    2

    P.

    Writing Clerk

    1

    10

    Joseph Nowel, Wife

    2

    Cooper

    1

    10

    Daniel Lilbe, Wife

    6

    P.

    Ship Carpenter

    2

    James Baly, Wife

    6

    P.

    House Carpenter

    2

    Elizabeth Child, single Woman

    P.

    1

    £64

    13

    Date Names Town now in Removed from No. of Childn. Relig. Profess. Occupation Sums

    Brot forward

    £64

    13

    John French, Wife

    Lancaster

    Boston

    2

    P.

    Carpenter

    1

    10

    Sarah Nicholson (Husband absent)

    P.

    1

    Hannah Langley W.

    1

    P.

    1

    5

    Mary Thompson W.

    1

    P.

    Nurse

    1

    8

    Mary Colter W. & grandchild

    P.

    Victualer

    1

    12

    Rebeckah Brown, single Woman

    P.

    Tailor

    1

    Mary Emmens W. an aged Mother

    4

    P.

    Mantuamaker

    2

    10

    Nicholas Pearce, Wife

    4

    P.

    Mason

    2

    Mary Pearce W.

    1

    P.

    Seamstress

    1

    10

    M. Grinno W.

    2

    P.

    Seamstress

    1

    12

    Ailce Collins W.

    1

    P.

    Schoolmistress

    1

    10

    Abigail Britt (husband 6 years absent)

    2

    P.

    Shopkeeper

    1

    10

    5th

    Lucy Wilco W.

    Northborough

    1

    P.

    Labourer

    1

    Mary Hiter, Orphan of 18

    P.

    1

    Michael Staply, Wife

    Waltham

    4

    P.

    Cooper

    1

    18

    George Frank, Wife

    3

    C.

    Labourer

    1

    15

    Peter Farr, Wife

    Northborough

    1

    P.

    Shoemaker

    1

    5

    Jacob Kuhn, duchman, his Wife, Daugr & Grandchild

    Marlborough

    2

    C.

    Tailor

    1

    10

    Samuel Jennison, Wife

    6

    P.

    Shoemaker

    2

    8

    Phillip Cline, Wife

    1

    C.

    Labourer

    1

    5

    Ezekiel Walker, Wife

    2

    P.

    Mason

    1

    15

    *Sarah Power W.144

    P.

    1

    *Widow Smith

    1

    P.

    1

    5

    *Widow Wane

    1

    P.

    1

    5

    *Spencer Walker, Wife

    2

    P.

    Tailor

    1

    10

    *Thomas Pitcher, Wife

    2

    P.

    Painter

    1

    10

    *Joseph Clow, Wife

    3

    P.

    Joiner

    1

    15

    *Widow Fowle

    2

    P.

    1

    10

    *David Brace, Wife

    4

    P.

    Mariner

    2

    10

    *Andrew Burges, Wife & 2 young Women

    P.

    Ropemaker

    2

    *Wm Swett, Wife

    2

    P.

    Schoolmistress

    2

    *Joshua Barrot & Wife

    P.

    Blacksmith

    1

    5

    *John White, Wife

    2

    P.

    Gardner

    1

    10

    *Abigail Pitcher W.

    Charlestown

    P.

    1

    10

    Sarah Kittle W.

    1

    P.

    1

    15

    John Williams, lame Man

    Boston

    P.

    Keeper of Boarders

    1

    10

    Mary Marvelick W.

    P.

    1

    10

    Elizabeth Quincy W.

    P.

    1

    10

    Ann Hart, Orphan

    P.

    1

    £124

    11

    Date Names Town now in Removed from No. of Childn. Relig. Profess. Occupation Sums

    Brot forward

    £124

    11

    Elisabeth Hilliard Daur of Joseph

    Marlborough

    Boston

    P.

    Seamstress

    15

    *Elijah Davis, Wife

    1

    P.

    Cooper

    1

    10

    Mary Feasanton, Orphan

    P.

    12

    *John Lane, Wife

    1

    P.

    Cordwainer

    1

    10

    *Widow Geer, Children & Grandchildren

    7

    P.

    Huckster

    2

    10

    6th 3d Mo.

    James Pratt, Wife

    Sudbury

    6

    B.

    Cooper

    2

    7

    Saml Webb, Wife

    7

    P.

    Bookbinder

    2

    10

    William Tate, Wife